Volume 2 - Appendices

Opendate_range27 Jul, 2022, 9:00am - 1 Sep, 2022, 4:30pm


Appendix 1: Housing Strategy

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 1.1

Volume 2: Appendix 1
Section: 3.1, Legislative Context
Page: 6, 2nd paragraph

Amendment:

Section 94 (3) of the Act (as amended by the Affordable Housing Act 2021 {and the Large-scale Residential Act 2021}) specifies that in preparing such a housing strategy, a planning authority shall take into account:

  • The existing need and likely future need for housing for the purposes of the provision of social housing support, affordable dwellings and cost rental housing;
  • The need to ensure that housing is available for persons who have different levels of income;
  • The need to ensure that a mixture of house types and sizes is developed to reasonably match the requirements of the different categories of households, as may be determined by the planning authority, and including the special requirements of older people and persons with disabilities;
  • The need to counteract undue segregation in housing between persons of different social backgrounds: and,
  • {The existing need and the likely future need for housing, in particular houses and duplexes, for purchase by intending owner-occupiers}.
Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 1.2

Volume 2: Appendix 1
Section: 3.1, Legislative Context
Page 8: Insert new paragraph after second bullet point

Amendment:

{The Planning and Development (Amendment) (Large-scale Residential Development) Act 2021 was signed into law in December 2021. In addition to the provisions regarding large scale residential development, Section 7 amends Part V of the Planning and Development Act so that the housing strategy prepared by a local authority shall take into account the need to ensure that the existing need and the likely future need for housing, in particular houses and duplexes, for purchase by intending owner occupiers, is provided for and estimated in its Housing Strategy.}

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 1.3

Volume 2: Appendix 1
Section: 3.3, National Housing Policy, subheading Housing First National Implementation Plan 2018–2021
Page: 17

Amendment:

(Housing First National Implementation Plan 2018–2021

This implementation plan was launched by the Minister of Housing and the Minister of Health in September 2018. The key principles of the Housing First approach are stated whereby housing will be provided to rough sleepers and the long-term homeless alongside a range of supports. The plan sets targets for each Local Authority area to deliver.)

{Housing First National Implementation Plan 2022-2026

Housing First is a housing-led approach that enables people with a history of rough sleeping or long-term use of emergency accommodation, and with complex needs, to obtain permanent secure accommodation, with the provision of intensive supports to help them to maintain their tenancies.}

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 1.4

Volume 2: Appendix 1
Section: 6.3.3 HNDA Forecasts
Page: 39, insert new text as 2nd paragraph

Amendment:

{The HNDA estimates a housing need for nearly 5,000 households during the Plan period in the owner-occupier sector. It is anticipated that apartment development will be the predominant housing type in this sector over the Plan period having regard to observed intercensal trends and to the policy framework set out at a national and regional level to promote compact growth and sustainable settlement patterns throughout the city.}

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 1.5

Volume 2: Appendix 1
Section: Housing Strategy, subheading Sub-City Residential Mix Requirements
Page: 58, Table 37: Mix of Residential Units, Minimum and Maximum Requirements - ‘Exemptions’ Cell, 3rd bullet point (page 59)

Amendment:

In accordance with Specific Planning Policy Requirement 2, all building refurbishment schemes on sites of any size, or urban infill schemes on sites of up to 0.25ha, where up to 9 residential units are proposed, notwithstanding SPPR 1, there shall be no restriction on dwelling mix, provided no more than 50 percent of the development (i.e. up to 4 units) comprises studio-type units. {For clarity, in accordance with SPPR 8, the unit mix requirement does not apply to units that are designed to a BTR standard.}

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 1.6

Volume 2: Appendix 1
Section: 7.2.3 Specialist Provision Support from Dublin City Council, subheading Meeting the Housing and Accommodation Needs of the Travelling Community
Page: 67, paragraph 2

Amendment:

(Group Housing is provided at Cara Park and Northern Close, Coolock; Avila Park and St Mary’s Park, Finglas; Labre Park and Kylemore Grove, Ballyfermot; and Bridgeview, Clondalkin. Halting Sites are provided at Tara Lawns, Coolock; St Margaret’s Park, Ballymun; St Joseph’s Park, Finglas and St Oliver’s Park, Clondalkin.)

{Dublin City Council Traveller Group Housing Schemes and Traveller Halting Sites}

North Central Area

 

Cara Park/ Close

Group Housing

Belcamp Lane, Coolock, D17

Tara Lawns

Halting Site

Belcamp Lane, Coolock, D17

Northern Close

Group Housing

Belcamp Lane, Coolock, D17

Grove Lane

Group Housing

Malahide Road, D17

 

North West Area

 

Avila Park/Close/ Gardens

Group Housing

Cappagh Road, Finglas, D11

St. Margaret’s Park

Halting Site

St Margaret’s Road, Ballymun, D11

St. Mary’s Park

Group Housing

Dunsink Lane, Finglas, D11

St. Joseph's Park

Halting Site

Dunsink Lane, Finglas, D11

South Central Area

 

Labre Park/ Kylemore Grove

Group Housing

Kylemore Road, Ballyfermot, D10

St. Oliver’s Park

Halting Site

Cloverhill Road, Clondalkin, D22

Bridgeview

Group Housing

Cloverhill Road, Clondalkin, D22

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 1.7

Volume 2: Appendix 1
Section 7.2.3 Specialist Provision Support from Dublin City Council
Meeting the Housing and Accommodation Needs of the Travelling Community
Page: 68

Amendment:

Insert map - Map of Dublin City Council Traveller Group Housing Schemes and Traveller Halting Sites

Title: Map of Dublin City Council Traveller Group Housing Scemes and Traveller Halting Sites - Description: This is one amendment to section 7.2.3 of Appendix 1 to Volume 2 that includes the introduction of a graphic map identifying the locations of twelve Traveller  group housing schemes and halting sites across the city.

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 1.8

Volume 2: Appendix 1

Section: 7.2.3 Specialist Provision Support from Dublin City Council, subheading Households Experiencing Homelessness and Rough Sleeping

Page: 69, final paragraph

Amendment:

Dublin City Council will support the implementation of the Homeless{ness} Action Plan Framework for Dublin 2019-2021 or any subsequent review {and the Housing First National Implementation Plan 2022-2026} and support related initiatives to address homelessness.

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 1.9

Volume 2: Appendix1
Section: 7.2.3 Specialist Provision Support from Dublin City Council, subheading Meeting the Housing Needs of Older Persons and Persons with Disabilities
Page: 70

Amendment:

Page 70: Paragraph 1

This housing strategy will facilitate the implementation of Dublin City Council’s Strategic Plan for Housing People with a Disability 2016, and its successor currently being drafted. Dublin City Council is also committed to implementing the framework for the delivery of housing for persons with disabilities set out under the(‘National Housing Strategy for People with Disability 2011–2016’ and its successor) {National Housing Strategy for Disabled People 2022 – 2027} . The strategy is about facilitating the provision of housing options and related services to persons with disabilities to allow individual choice and support independent living.

(A new national strategy, National Housing Strategy for Persons with Disabilities 2022-2027 is being developed with the objective of facilitating the provision of housing options and related services to people with disabilities to allow individual choice and support independent living. The provisions of the new national strategy will be incorporated into any forthcoming review of the development plan.)

Page 70: Paragraph 2

Dublin City Council is committed to implementing Universal Design models to all new developments and encouraging private developers to incorporate them into all residential dwelling design proposals having regard to the Universal Design Guidelines for Homes in Ireland, published by the National Disability Authority in 2015. All new housing should be designed in a way that is adaptable and flexible to the changing needs of the homeowner as set out in the Lifetime Homes Guidance contained in Section 5.2 of the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government ‘Quality Housing for Sustainable Communities – Best Practice Guidelines for Delivering Homes Sustaining Communities’ (2007) {and to the Department’s Design Manual for Quality Housing 2022.} In line with Part M of the Building Regulations (as amended), all public and private buildings must also have provision for suitable access and use for all persons.

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 1.10

Volume 2: Appendix1
Section: 7.2.3 Specialist Provision Support from Dublin City Council, subheading: Meeting the Housing Needs of Older Persons and Persons with Disabilities
Page: 72, 3rd paragraph

Amendment:

(This housing strategy will support a commitment whereby a minimum of 10 percent of dwellings in all schemes over 100 units are designed to accommodate people with disabilities and older people in accordance with the Universal Design Guidelines for Homes in Ireland, 2015.)

{This housing strategy will support an objective to ensure that 50% of apartments in any development that are required to be in excess of minimum sizes should be designed to be suitable for older people/mobility impaired people and people with disabilities in accordance with the guidelines set out in the Universal Design Guidelines for Homes in Ireland 2015, the DHLG&H’s Design Manual for Quality Housing 2022 and the DHP&LG & DH’s Housing Options for Our Ageing Population Policy Statement 2019.} 

 

Appendix 2: Retail Strategy

No material amendments proposed.

 

Appendix 3: Achieving Sustainable Compact Growth

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 3.1

Volume 2: Appendix 3
Section: 3.0 Understanding Height and Density – the Strategic Approach, Subsection 3.2. - Density
Page: 220, Table 2: Indicative Plot Ratio and Site Coverage

Amendment:

Indicative Site Coverage.

Central Area (80-90%) {60-90%.}

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 3.2

Volume 2: Appendix 3
Section: 4.0 The Compact City – How to Achieve Sustainable Height and Density, subsection 4.1 Introduction – Identification of Areas for Increased Height and Density
Page: 222, last paragraph

Amendment:

In considering locations for greater height and density, all schemes must have regard to the local prevailing context within which they are situated. This is particularly important in the lower scaled (suburban) areas of the city where broader consideration must be given to potential impacts such as overshadowing and overlooking, as well as the visual, functional, environmental and cumulative impacts of increased building height.

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 3.3

Volume 2: Appendix 3
Section: 4.0 The Compact City – How to Achieve Sustainable Height and Density, subsection 4.1 Introduction – Identification of Areas for Increased Height and Density
Page: 223, sub section Key Criteria

Amendment:

Insert Text after Key Criteria

Key Criteria {- (See Table 3).}

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 3.4

Volume 2: Appendix 3
Section: 4.0 The Compact City – How to Achieve Sustainable Height and Density, subsection 4.1 Introduction: Key Locations - City Centre and within the Canal Ring (inner suburbs)
Page: 224, first paragraph

Amendment:

In general, and in accordance with the Guidelines, a default position of 6 storeys will be promoted in the city centre and within the canal ring subject to site specific characteristics and heritage/environmental considerations (.){and social considerations in respect of sustaining existing inner city residential communities}.

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 3.5

Volume 2: Appendix 3
Section: Table 3: Performance Criteria in Assessing Proposals for Enhanced Height, Density and Scale; Objective 4
Page: 231, last bullet point

Amendment:

Provide for people friendly streets and spaces {and prioritise street accessibility for persons with a disability.}

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 3.6

Volume 2: Appendix 3
Section: Table 3: Performance Criteria in Assessing Proposals for Enhanced Height, Density and Scale; Objective 7
Page: 233

Amendment:

(have appropriate and reasonable regard to quantitative approaches to assessing daylighting and sun lighting proposals.  Where appropriate, satisfactory, alternative compensatory design solutions should be provided for a failure to meet reasonable daylighting provisions, in the context of a constrained site or securing wider objectives such as comprehensive urban regeneration or an effective urban design and streetscape solution – see Appendix 16.)

{apply appropriate quantitative approaches to assessing daylighting and sun lighting proposals.   In exceptional circumstances compensatory design solutions may be allowed for where the meeting of sun lighting and daylighting requirements is not possible in the context of a particular site (See Appendix 16).}

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 3.7

Volume 2: Appendix 3
Section: Table 3: Performance Criteria in Assessing Proposals for Enhanced Height, Density and Scale; Objective 7
Page: 233, insert bullet point after last bullet point

Amendment:

Insert bullet point on Page 233 after last bullet point on SFRA.

  • {include an assessment of embodied energy impacts – see Section 15.7.1}
Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 3.8

Volume 2: Appendix 3
Section: Table 4: Performance Criteria in Assessing Proposals for Landmark Tall Building/s, Objective 2
Page: 238 after ‘adapted overtime’ bullet

Amendment:

  • {include an assessment of embodied energy impacts – see Section 15.7.1}
Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 3.9

Volume 2: Appendix 3
Section: Table 4: Performance Criteria in Assessing Proposals for Landmark Tall Building/s, Objective 5
Page: 239, last bullet point

Amendment:

All tall building proposals must be accompanied by a full transport capacity assessment. The intensity of use associated with tall buildings will only be appropriate if it is supported by an appropriate level of transport capacity to ensure good pedestrian {, disability} and public transport access.

 

Appendix 4: Development Plan Mandatory Requirements

No material amendments proposed.

 

Appendix 5: Transport and Mobility: Technical Requirements

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 5.1

Volume 2:
Appendix 5: Transport and Mobility: Technical Requirements
Section: 4.0 Car Parking Standards; Table 2: Maximum Car Parking Standards for Various Land Uses
Page: 263

Amendment:

Category

Land-Use

Zone 1

Zone 2

Zone 3

Accommodation

Hotel1

None

1 per 3 rooms

1 per room

Nursing Home

Retirement Home

1 per 3 residents

1 per 2 residents

1 per 2 residents

Elderly Persons Housing

Sheltered Housing

1 per 4 dwellings

1 per 2 dwellings

1 per 2 dwellings

Student Accommodation

None2

1 per 20 bed spaces

1 per 10 bed spaces

Houses

Apartments/ Duplexes

(1) {0.5}per dwelling

1 per dwelling

1 per dwelling

 

Appendix 6: Conservation

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 6.1

Volume 2:
Appendix 6: Conservation
Section: 4.3 Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage (DHLGH) Guidelines
Page: 300

Amendment:

Archaeology (and) {in} the Planning Process {(Planning Leaflet 13; 2021)}

  • {Built and Archaeological Heritage Climate Change Sectoral Adaptation Plan, (2019).}

 

Appendix 10: Infrastructure Capacity Assessment

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 10.1

Volume 2:
Appendix: 10 Infrastructure Capacity Assessment
Section: 4.1.1 Table 1: Strategic Water Supply Infrastructure (Source: Irish Water)
Page: 333-334

Amendment:

Table 1: Strategic Water Supply Infrastructure (Source: Irish Water)

Project Name

Project Delivery

Zoning Tier

(Eastern Midlands Water Supply Scheme){Water Supply Project – Eastern and Midlands Region}

The long-term development of the Eastern and Midland Region (EMR) will be dependent on this project. The NPF provides that a new long-term water supply source for the EMR, which includes the Dublin Water Supply Area, is needed by the mid 2020’s, to provide for projected growth up to 2050 and contribute to resilience and security of supply.

The project involves a 170km pipeline with supporting infrastructure (water treatment plant, pumping stations and terminal point reservoir) to ensure that the long-term water supply needs of the Region are met in a sustainable manner. IW has concluded a four-phase public consultation process and identified the preferred scheme:

  • Abstraction of water from the Lower {River}Shannon at Parteen Basin.
  • Water treatment at Birdhill.
  • Treated water piped to a termination point reservoir at Peamount in south County Dublin, with supplies of treated water available to Midland communities along the route.

Identified in the {National Development Plan (NDP)} ‘Strategic Investment Priorities – {Water Quality} (2018-2027’).

Estimated cost of €1(.2 to €1.3)billion{+} (source: NDP).

IW are in the process of preparing a SID planning application to An Bord Pleanála for the scheme.

Tier 1 - All sites subject to connection agreement with Irish Water (in line with existing standard practice).

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 10.2

Volume 2:
Appendix: 10 Infrastructure Capacity Assessment
Section: 4.1.2 Wastewater Infrastructure, Table 2
Page: 335

Amendment:

Table 1: Strategic Wastewater Infrastructure (Source: Irish Water)

Project Name

Project Delivery

Zoning Tier

Ringsend Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrade Project

The Ringsend Waste Water Treatment Plant which, whilst currently overcapacity, is undergoing significant upgrades in response to capacity issues which will allow the plant to treat increasing volumes of wastewater by 2025.

This upgrade project will increase the capacity of the Ringsend plant from c. 1.64m population equivalent (PE) to c. 2.4m PE. This will provide for both existing population and future growth, and bring benefits in terms of health, environmental protection and improved water quality. The project includes:

  • Additional secondary treatment capacity.
  • Works to facilitate the use of aerobic granular sludge technology in the existing secondary treatment tanks.
  • Expansion of the plant’s sludge treatment facilities.

Identified in the NDP.

Currently under construction and due for completion in 2025.

Phased increase in capacity (2.1m PE in 202{3}(2) and 2.4m PE in 2025).

Estimated cost of c. €400m (source: Irish Water).

Tier 1 - All sites subject to connection agreement with Irish Water (in line with existing standard practice).

 

Greater Dublin Drainage Project (GDDP)

The GDDP aims to provide long-term sustainable wastewater drainage and treatment to facilitate the continued social and economic development of the Region.

The project involves the provision of new wastewater treatment works, a marine outfall and a new drainage network in the northern part of the GDA.

Together, with the upgrade of the Ringsend Wastewater Treatment Plant, these projects are intended to provide adequate wastewater treatment to serve the GDA to 2050. It is anticipated that the GDDP will provide the additional treatment capacity required from the mid-2020s.

Identified in the NDP within the category ‘Strategic Investment Priorities – {Water Quality} (2018-2027’).

Planning application is under determination. Construction scheduled for 2022-2026.

Estimated cost of c. €500m {- €1bn}(source: NDP).

Tier 1 - All sites subject to connection agreement with Irish Water (in line with existing standard practice).

 

 

Source: Irish Water

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 10.3

Volume 2:
Appendix: 10 Infrastructure Capacity Assessment
Section: 4.2.1 Key Public Transport Projects
Page: 337-338, 1st paragraph & Table 3

Amendment:

Table 2: Key Public Transport Projects (Source: NDP and NTA/TII)

The (Transport Strategy for the Greater Dublin Area (GDA) prepared by the National Transportation Authority (NTA), {National Transport Authority (draft) Strategy for the GDA 2022-2042,} provides for a number of key transport projects of strategic importance which will improve public transport provision across the city, and support ongoing sustainable growth focussed on the integration of land use and transportation. The following projects are of particular importance in the content of the strategic growth areas identified in the Core Strategy{:}

Table 3: Key Public Transport Projects (Source: NDP and NTA/TII)

Project Name

Project Delivery

Zoning Tier

Luas Green Line {Upgrade / Capacity}(Enhancement Project)

This project (is) {seeks to} incrementally increase{e}(ing) capacity on the network {through the provision of additional fleet and necessary infrastructure to meet forecast passenger demand.} (a combination of higher frequencies, additional trams and larger rolling stock.

  • Phase 1 - involves extending existing trams to increase passenger capacity by c. 30%.
  • Phase 2 - involves increasing tram frequency to every two minutes which would greatly increase carrying capacity.)

Identified in the NDP and the NTA’s (Draft) (Transport)Strategy for the GDA {2022-2042} (2016-2035).

{Delivery over the period 2022-2030.} (of tram extensions commenced in Q2 2019 and due to be complete by Q2 2021.

Delivery of new trams to commence in Q2 2020 and due to be complete by Q2 2021.

Estimated cost c. 100m)

{Cost estimate not currently available.}

Tier 1 - Subject to assessment on site-by-site basis.

Luas to Finglas ((2028){2031-2042)}

The preferred route for the extended Luas Tram line to Finglas has recently been released by TII and NTA with a decision to be made on final alignment.

 

Luas Finglas will create a new public transport connection between the communities of Charlestown, Finglas Village, Finglas west, St. Helena’s, Tolka Valley and the city centre and will include the delivery of new cycle and pedestrian infrastructure.

Identified in the NDP and the NTA’s (Draft) (Transport)Strategy for the GDA {2022-2042} (2016-2035).

NDP commits to undertake appraisal, planning and design of LUAS network expansion to Finglas. {A public consultation on its Emerging Preferred Route has been completed and it is expected that a Railway Order application will be submitted in 2023/2024.}

Luas likely to become operational {after} (by) 2028.

Cost estimate not currently available

Tier 1 - Subject to assessment on site-by-site basis.

Bus Connects (2021 – 202(3){4})

Bus Connects Dublin aims to overhaul the current bus system in Dublin through a 10-year programme of integrated actions to deliver a more efficient, reliable and better bus system. Bus Connects includes:

  • Redesign of the bus network with high frequency spines, orbital routes and increased bus services.
  • New cycle network.
  • New ticketing and cashless payment system.
  • New bus stops and shelters with better signage and information.
  • Bus-based park and rides in strategic locations.
  • New bus livery and transitioning to a new bus fleet with low emission vehicle technologies.

The NDP {identifies}(commits to the delivery of the full) BusConnects {as a Strategic Investment Priority over the period 2021-2030.}

(programme during the period to 2027.)

Project is at public consultation stage.

Estimated cost of €2billion (source: NDP).

 

Tier 1 - Subject to assessment on site-by-site basis.

Metrolink: (Metro to Ballymun) ((andonto) Dublin Airport/Swords) (2021 - 2027)

MetroLink is the proposed high-capacity, high-frequency, automated rail line running from Swords to Charlemont, linking Dublin Airport, Irish Rail, DART, Dublin Bus and Luas services, creating fully integrated public transport in the Greater Dublin Area. As well as linking major transport hubs, MetroLink will connect key destinations including Ballymun to the city centre.

TII due to apply for Railway Order {and planning consent for Metrolink} in 202(1){2}.

12-18 month planning process will commence once Railway Order granted and following this, work can commence on site. (It is anticipated that it will take between 6-8 years to complete) {No estimated completion date is currently available for the project.}

Estimated cost is €(3) {1}billion{+} (source: NDP)

Tier 1 - Subject to assessment on site-by-site basis.

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 10.4

Volume 2:
Appendix: 10 Infrastructure Capacity Assessment
Section: 4.2 Transport Infrastructure
Page: 339, Figure 3

Amendment:

Figure 1:       {Dublin Proposed} (Greater Dublin Area) Public Transport Network (2027) (Source: National Development Plan (2018-2027) {2021-2030})

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 10.5

Volume 2:
Appendix: 10 Infrastructure Capacity Assessment
Section: 5.2 Active Travel – Walking and Cycling
Page: page 340, 1st paragraph

Amendment:

{Certain critical factors are required to} (To) make active travel an attractive alternative choice to car-based transport on the existing public road network, and to facilitate the 15-minute city concept of creating active, healthy communities with ease of access to amenities and services (,certain critical factors are required).

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 10.6

Volume 2:
Appendix: 10 Infrastructure Capacity Assessment
Section: 6.2 Other Lands
Page: page 346, 3rd paragraph

Amendment:

The implementation of a proactive land and development management strategy, enhanced partnership-working and coordination, and the effective utilisation of URDF funding, will be crucial to achieving the delivery of c. 13,(600){000} housing units on these non-SDRA lands.

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 10.7

Volume 2:
Appendix: 10 Infrastructure Capacity Assessment
Section: 7.0 Assessment Conclusion
Page: page 347, Table 6

Amendment:

Table 6: Settlement Capacity Audit – Summary Table

Tier

Settlement

Existing Population

Potential Housing Estimate

Tier 1 - Serviced lands

Dublin City other lands (excluding SDRAs)

595,434

(2020, CSO Estimate)

13,(600){000}

Dublin City SDRA lands

34,350 - 35,550

Tier 2 - Serviceable lands

Potential lands at Glasnevin & Naas Road, Phase 1

6,000

 

Appendix 11: Technical Summary of Dublin City Council Green Roof Guidance

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 11.1

Volume 2:
Appendix: 11 Technical Summary of Dublin City Council Green Roof Guidance
Section: 1.2 Benefits of Green and Blue Roofs, Subsection on ‘National Policy’
Page: 351

Amendment:

{European/} National Policy

  • {Nature-based Solutions to the Management of Rainwater and Surface Water Runoff in Urban Areas Water: Sensitive Urban Design Best Practice Interim Guidance Document (2021)}
  • National Biodiversity Action Plan 2017– 2021 {or any successor plan.}

 

Appendix 12: Technical Summary of Dublin City Council Design Guidance Document for Implementing SuDS Solutions

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 12.1

Volume 2:
Appendix: 12 Technical Summary of Dublin City Council Design Guidance Document for Implementing SuDS Solutions
Section: 1.0 Introduction
Page: 355, 3rd paragraph insert text

Amendment:

Since the GDSDS was first published, it has been commonplace for drainage schemes to include underground tanks or ‘end of pipe’ structures to hold surface water and restrict the rate of flow leaving the development. However, this simplistic approach does not accord with the original vision for SuDS as outlined by the GDSDS. Underground tanks offer no benefits in terms of improved water quality, nor do they make provision for amenity or biodiversity.

{The National Planning Framework (2018) seeks to enhance water quality and resource management by ensuring that flood risk management and RBMP objectives are fully considered through the physical planning process and through the integration of sustainable water management solutions into place-making. The forthcoming 3rd cycle RBMP for the period 2022 to 2027 will address the impact of urban run-off on our water environment by strengthening the delivery of water sensitive urban design in how local authorities and others plan for, build and maintain our urban areas. Nature-based solutions to the management of rainwater and surface water run-off surface water management (i.e. SuDS) will be central to delivering on this objective in line with government policy published in the SuDS Interim Guide (2021).}

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 12.2

Volume 2:
Appendix: 12 Technical Summary of Dublin City Council Design Guidance Document for Implementing SuDS Solutions
Section: 1.0 Introduction, bullet points under ‘National Policy’
Page: 356, insert text

Amendment:

{European/} National Policy

  • {Water Framework Directive
  • National Planning Framework 2018
  • River Basin Management Plan (2nd and 3rd cycles)
  • Nature-based Solutions to the Management of Rainwater and Surface Water Runoff in Urban Areas Water: Sensitive Urban Design Best Practice Interim Guidance Document (2021)}
  • National Biodiversity Action Plan 2017– 2021 {or any successor plan.}
Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 12.3

Volume 2:
Appendix: 12 Technical Summary of Dublin City Council Design Guidance Document for Implementing SuDS Solutions
Section: 1.1 What are SuDS?
Page: 357, 4th paragraph bullet point list

Amendment:

There are four critical objectives that SuDS seek to meet:

  • Quantity: {preserve natural hydrological systems / surface water resources by} managing flows and volumes to match the rainfall characteristics before development, in order to prevent {flooding on-site and within the receiving catchment.} (flooding from outside the development, within the site and downstream of the development)
  • Quality: preventing and treating pollution to ensure that clean water is available as soon as possible to provide amenity{,} (and) biodiversity {and climate resilience} benefits within the development, as well as protecting watercourses, groundwater and the sea.
  • Biodiversity: {protecting natural habitats, providing ecological connectivity and creating/ supporting sustainable ecosystems} (maximising the potential for wildlife) through {the} design and management of SuDS.
  • Amenity: enhancing people’s quality of life through (an) integrated {place-making and} design that provides {for climate resilient,} useful and attractive multi-functional spaces.

 

Appendix 15: Land Use Definitions

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 15.1

Volume 2, Appendix 15
Land Use Definitions
Page: 395

Amendment:

Add following text:

{Social and Community Infrastructure: is the physical infrastructure necessary for successful communities, i.e. community infrastructure such as schools, libraries, community centres, cultural spaces, health centres, facilities for the elderly and persons with disabilities, childcare facilities, parks, and other facilities and spaces for play and recreational activity.}

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 15.2

Volume 2, Appendix 15
Land Use Definitions
Page: 395

Sports Facility {and Recreational Uses}

A building, or part thereof, or land used for organised competitive activity {and/or recreational use} that aims to promote physical activity and well being e.g.

 

Appendix 16: Sunlight and Daylight

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 16.1

Appendix 16
Section: 3.5 National Policy
Page: 401

Amendment:

3.5 National Policy

Beyond guidance given in the Dublin City Development Plan 2022 – 2028, direction and information on daylight and sunlight is given within the Urban Development and Building Height Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2018) and the Sustainable Urban Housing: Design Standards for New Apartments (December 2020). Both documents refer to BR209 and BS 8206-2. Neither document refers to BS EN 17037 or {IS} EN 17037.

{For clarity, appropriate and reasonable regard should be taken of government policies, including the Urban Development and Building Height Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2018) and the Sustainable Urban Housing: Design Standards for New Apartments (December 2020), in the completion of sunlight and daylight assessments.}

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 16.2

Appendix 16
Section: 4.0 Relevant Metrics
Page: 4.4: Insert new subsection after subsection 4.6, on page 404

Amendment:

{4.7 Vertical Sky Component (VSC – skylight metric)

The Vertical Sky Component is defined in BR 209 as the “Ratio of that part of illuminance, at a point on a given vertical plane, that is received directly from a Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) standard overcast sky, to illuminance on a horizontal plane due to an unobstructed hemisphere of this sky”.}

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 16.3

Appendix 16
5.0 Assessment Methodologies
Pages 404, 405, 406
Sections 5.1, 5.2 and 5.3.

Amendment:

5.1 Performance of the Proposed Development

  • Annual Probable Sunlight Hours on all {relevant} windows
  • Winter Sunlight Hours on all {relevant} windows
  • Sunlight on Ground in all amenity spaces
  • Average Daylight Factor in all habitable rooms
  • No Sky Line in all habitable rooms
  • Target Illuminance in all habitable rooms

5.2 Impact on the Surrounding Properties

  • Vertical Sky Component on all {relevant} surrounding windows
  • Annual Probable Sunlight Hours on all {relevant} surrounding windows
  • Winter Sunlight Hours on all {surrounding} windows
  • Sunlight on Ground in all surrounding amenity spaces

5.3 Other Criteria and Considerations

In addition to the above metrics, the planning authority (notes the points below for clarity) {will require consideration of the points below, save in agreed exceptional circumstances:}

When assessing the impact of a proposed development, it is expected that all surrounding properties are assessed. It is not acceptable to assess only the surrounding residential properties. Residential properties should be clearly marked out and results for these presented separately.

When assessing the impact of a proposed development on the existing surrounding properties, it is expected that the rule within clause 2.2.4 of BR 209 is applied. This rule outlines that “Loss of light to existing windows need not be analysed if the distance of each part of the new development from the existing window is three or more times its height above the centre of the existing window”. Thus, all surrounding buildings that sit within three times the height of the proposed development shall be included within the assessment. {The assessment can then use methods typically applied in BR 209 to determine the correct approach to investigating loss of light.}

When analysing the results found to investigate the impact of a proposed development on the surrounding existing buildings, it is expected that the nomenclature and associated descriptions from within Appendix I of BR 209 are used. The wordings of negligible, minor adverse, moderate adverse and major adverse have defined meanings. These meanings have associated descriptors, and these shall be applied during the analytics section of reports. Appendix I in BR 209 provides these descriptions in full.

The use of average daylight factor in assessing the impact of a new development on surrounding existing developments is not permitted.

Where alternate target values are being set, this shall be completed in line with Appendix F of BR 209.

When analysing the performance of a proposed development, it is expected that all rooms with an expectation for daylight are assessed. Assessing only a sample of rooms is not permitted.

When determining input factors for simulations, (the criteria below shall be applied. Deviations from these values shall not be accepted.) {applicants shall clearly state their assumptions.}

(Table 1: Input Parameters

Input Parameter

Value

Internal floor reflectance

20 %

Internal wall reflectance

50 %

Internal ceiling reflectance

70 %

External material reflectance

20 %

Glazing Transmission

70 %

Glazing Maintenance Factor

88 %

Framing Factor

95 %

Grid Height above ground (Residential)

0.85 m

Grid Height above ground (Commercial))

0.70 m

Appendix 17: Advertising and Signage Strategy

No material amendments proposed.

Appendix 18: Ancillary Residential Accommodation

Material Alteration Reference Number Appendix 18.1

Appendix 18
Section: 7.0 Ancillary Family Accommodation
Page: 435, 1st paragraph

Amendment:

Ancillary family accommodation refers to a subdivision or extension of a single family dwelling unit to accommodate an immediate family member for a temporary period (e.g. elderly parent) or where an immediate relative with a disability, illness or {specific temporary housing need} may need to live in close proximity to their family.