Chapter 13: Strategic Development Regeneration Areas (SDRAs)

Opendate_range25 Nov, 2021, 12:00am - 14 Feb, 2022, 4:30pm

13.1   Introduction

The purpose of this chapter is to set out the overarching framework and guiding principles for the designated Strategic Development Regeneration Areas (SDRAs). As outlined in the core strategy, a key element in the delivery of compact growth will be the sustainable development of the SDRAs.

17 SDRAs have been identified and are set out in the table below and are also identified on Map K. It is considered that these areas are capable of delivering significant quantities of homes and employment for the city. The active land management measures and approach referred to under the core strategy will be pursued in the development and delivery of the SDRAs.

Table 13.1 Strategic Development Regeneration Areas (SDRAs)

SDRA Number

SDRA Name

SDRA 1

Clongriffin /Belmayne and Environs

SDRA 2

Ballymun

SDRA 3

Finglas Village Environs and Jamestown Lands

SDRA 4

Park West/Cherry Orchard

SDRA 5

Naas Road

SDRA 6

Docklands

SDRA 7

Heuston and Environs

SDRA 8

Grangegorman/Broadstone

SDRA 9

Emmet Road

SDRA 10

North East Inner City

SDRA 11

St. Teresa’s Gardens and Environs

SDRA 12

Dolphin House

SDRA 13

Markets Area & Environs

SDRA 14

St. James Medical Campus & Environs

SDRA 15

Liberties and Newmarket Square

SDRA 16

Oscar Traynor Road

SDRA 17

Werburgh Street

For each SDRA, a series of guiding principles are set out and indicated on an accompanying plan. It should be noted that in some instances, SDRAs are also governed by an adopted Local Area Plan or SDZ Planning Scheme. The guiding principles for these SDRAs should be read in conjunction with the zoning objectives and principles and other objectives and policies of the plan.

The guiding principles plans are not intended to be prescriptive, but seek to set out an overall strategy for each site in terms of the appropriate form and scale of development, key routes and permeability, open space etc. Minor deviations from the guiding principles map may be acceptable where the applicant can demonstrate that the overall intent of the guiding principles has been incorporated and considered and that an appropriate development response for the site has been developed.

Structures for community/stakeholder consultation within the SDRAs will follow the procedures set out in Chapter 16 – Monitoring and Implementation of the plan.

13.2   Overarching Principles

In addition to the site specific guiding principles, all proposals within SDRAs will be governed by a series of overarching principles set out below. It should also be noted that all development proposals must have regard to the development management standards – both qualitative and quantitative, set out in Chapter 15.

Architectural Design and Urban Design: All development within the SDRAs must be of the highest architectural quality and adhere to the key architectural and urban design principles set out in Chapter 15 in order to create long term, viable and sustainable communities aligned with the principles of the 15-minute city.

Phasing: Large scale development proposals should be developed in accordance with agreed phasing plans to ensure that adequate social and physical infrastructure is delivered in tandem with development.

Access and Permeability: Development proposals should ensure adequate permeability and connectivity to surrounding neighbourhoods and public transport infrastructure through the provision of high quality, accessible public realm and high quality walking and cycling infrastructure. Access and layout should accord with the principles of DMURS.

Height: Guiding principles regarding height are set out for each SDRA. Where development adjoins lower scaled residential communities, development must be appropriately designed so that no significant adverse impacts on the residential amenities of adjacent residential properties arises. The performance criteria set out in Appendix 3 should be adhered to for developments of significant scale and/or density.

Urban Greening and Biodiversity: Development proposals within the SDRA must ensure the integration of greening and biodiversity measures including high quality public open space as well as micro greening measures including green walls, green roofs, parklets etc. In general, unless otherwise specified under a separate LAP/SDZ Planning Scheme policy/objective or site specific guiding principle, a minimum of 10% public open space should be provided as part of all development proposals in SDRAs. A financial contribution in lieu of same will only be considered in exceptional circumstances.

Surface Water Management: All development proposals should provide for sustainable surface water management and the installation of sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) in order to reduce surface water runoff and potential flooding. This should be considered in conjunction with open space design and greening/biodiversity initiatives. See Appendix 11, 12 and 13 for further detail.

River Restoration: Opportunities for enhanced river corridors are applicable to the following Strategic Development and Regeneration Areas (SDRAs) in order to harness significant opportunities for river restoration where feasible: SDRA 1 Clongriffin/Belmayne and Environs; SDRA 3 Finglas Village Environs and Jamestown Lands; SDRA 4 Park West/Cherry Orchard; SDRA 5 Naas Road; SDRA 6 Docklands; SDRA 7 Heuston and Environs; SDRA 9 Emmet Road; SDRA 10 North East Inner City and SDRA 16 Oscar Traynor Road. See Chapter 9, Policy SI12 for further detail.

Sustainable Energy: Climate Action Energy Statements for significant new residential and commercial developments, in Strategic Development and Regeneration Areas (SDRAs), will be required to investigate local heat sources and networks, and, where feasible, to demonstrate that the proposed development will be ‘District Heating Enabled’ in order to facilitate a connection to an available or developing district heating network. Further specific guidance regarding ‘District Heating Enabled’ Development is set out in Chapter 15 and should be complied with.

Specific guidance is set out regarding SDRA 6 (Docklands) and SDRA 10 (NEIC) where applicants must demonstrate how a proposed development is District Heating Enabled and will connect to the ‘Docklands and Poolbeg’ DDHS catchment. Guidance is also set out regarding SDRA 7 (Heuston and Environs), SDRA 8 (Grangegorman/Broadstone), SDRA 11 (St. Teresa’s Garden and Environs), SDRA 14 (St. James Medical Campus & Environs), SDRA 15 (Liberties and Newmarket Square) where possible connections or interconnections to existing heat networks in the area, to create a district heating ‘node’ must be investigated.

Climate Change: Proposed developments within the SDRA shall be required to apply innovative approaches to energy efficiency, energy conservation and the use of renewable energy in order to contribute to achieving zero carbon developments.

Cultural Infrastructure: All new regeneration areas (SDRAs) and large scale developments above 10,000 sq. m. in total area must provide 5% community, arts and culture internal floorspace as part of their development. See policy CUO21, Chapter 12 for further details.

View over Dublin

13.3   SDRA 1 – Clongriffin/Belmayne and Environs

Introduction

The long term vision for Clongriffin – Belmayne was first set out in the North Fringe Area Action Plan in 2000. A Local Area Plan was made in 2012 and subsequently extended in 2017 for a further 5 years so that its objectives could be fully realised, following the slowdown in construction from 2008. The overall vision of the lands is to facilitate a highly sustainable, mixed use neighbourhood, centred on key public transport interchanges, with a distinct identity and sense of place.

In 2020, a Masterplan was prepared for c.24 Ha of mostly Council owned lands at the Key Urban Village at Belmayne and Belcamp Lane, setting out a detailed urban design strategy for urban structure, movement and land use in line with the LAP, to guide the development of these lands. Upon completion of the Main Street extension to Malahide Road, the development potential of lands will be unlocked which will facilitate the development of the Key Urban Village. Permission has also been granted for new primary and post primary schools at Belmayne Avenue.

The rationale for designating Clongriffin-Belmayne as a Strategic Development and Regeneration Area (SDRA) is to provide a strategic spatial and urban design framework, so that the objectives of the City Development Plan can guide future development; and to ensure that that the phasing and implementation strategy envisaged in the LAP can be delivered as part of the future build-out of the lands, when the LAP expires. There are approximately 57 ha of undeveloped land within the LAP. While extant planning permissions exist on a number of these sites at Clongriffin and Belmayne, the lands can generate significant new residential units. The majority of this build-out would be focused on the KUV at Clongriffin and Belmayne Town Centre and at Belcamp, in addition to the phase 6 lands identified in the LAP. Additionally, the wider lands are identified in the RSES and MASP as playing a strategic role in facilitating the consolidation of the Dublin Metropolitan Area, by providing new homes and communities that are focused on existing and proposed public transport corridors.

The guiding principles for the development of Clongriffin / Belmayne are set out below:

Urban Structure

The overall urban structure envisaged by the LAP (as indicated in the Belmayne Masterplan) is comprised of one Key Urban Village (KUV), split between  Clongriffin Train Station to the east and at Malahide Road (Clarehall / Northern Cross) to the west, connected by a Main Street boulevard, greenways and interspersed by a network of urban squares, parks and green spaces. In order to deliver the vision, key infrastructure is required to be delivered as set out below:

  • Completion of Clongriffin KUV centre to include the development of key sites adjacent to the train station, east of Father Collins Park.
  • Completion / upgrade of Belmayne Main Street in order to provide a strategic east-west connection, linking the Key Urban Village (KUV) centre at Clongriffin Railway Station Square to the Key Urban Village (KUV) centre at Belmayne Town Centre at Malahide Road, and facilitate high quality bus, cycle and pedestrian facilities. This street was approved by Dublin City Council under the Part 8 planning process and received funding from LIHAF. It will also incorporate Core Bus Corridor No. 1 from Clongriffin Railway Station to the city centre, under the Bus Connects project. The completion of this link will open up lands for development and will facilitate the development of Belmayne Town Centre.
  • Provision of Belmayne Town Centre at the intersection between Belmayne Main Street and Malahide Road, focused on a new town square at the western end of Main Street, and facilitating a mix of retail, commercial and leisure uses.
  • Belmayne – Belcamp green link along Belmayne Main Street to the east and Belcamp Avenue to the west of Malahide Road, improving connections between the four quadrants of the Malahide Road junction, and providing a connection between the Town Centre and major areas of open space (Darndale Park to Father Collins Park), schools and other amenities.
  • Provision of new link street - ‘Belcamp Parkway’ between Malahide Road and the R139, bypassing the R139/R107 junction, with new signalised access off Malahide Road, in order to reduce traffic through the town centre. This will facilitate the redesign of the R139/R107 junction to better cater for pedestrians and cyclists and public transport. It will also provide a key western access to the Belcamp Lane lands, facilitating future development.
  • To facilitate the provision of further road infrastructure to the north of ‘Belcamp Parkway’ in accordance with the forthcoming NTA Strategy and explore the feasibility of implementing the recommendations of the South Fingal Study, in order to enhance connections between Dublin City Council and Fingal County Council areas.
  • To ensure that the future development on the Phase 6 LAP lands to the east, north of the R139, are considered in the context of the wider development of the Belcamp lands in Fingal County Council. Development shall provide connectivity, including pedestrian and cycle links. Development proposals will be required to facilitate the provision of the River Mayne Greenway, providing links to the east, and associated riparian strip / linear park. Existing hedgerows on the subject lands shall be retained and incorporated into the design and layout of future developments and be situated within the public realm.
  • Provision of the River Mayne Greenway and Linear Park in order to link the SDRA lands to the existing/proposed coastal greenway, part of the strategic East Coast Trail, proving a key amenity corridor, facilitating walking and cycling, while protecting and enhancing the biodiversity value of this corridor.
  • Enhance and improve connections between Clongriffin and Baldoyle/Stapolin lands across the railway line at Clongriffin Train Station and at the River Mayne, in coordination with Fingal County Council.
  • Urban Form and Block Layouts shall be arranged in a perimeter block configuration and shall form a continuous urban edge with the street in order to create enclosure, provide passive surveillance and animation. Typical block widths shall generally be in the range of between 45-50 m (lower scale housing) to 55-60 m (higher scale apartments). This will enable suitable separation distances to be achieved between the rear of blocks, as well as providing for private open space.

Land Use & Activity

  • A rich mix of uses to include retail, commercial, community, employment and residential uses will be sought on these lands, relative to the two KUV centres. At Belcamp the development will be primarily residential with a mix of typologies and tenures supported by community and social infrastructure. Commercial uses will be located along the Malahide Road and around the Town Squares at the Malahide Road junction.
  • Residential densities shall be highest within the two KUV centres and along Main Street, in proximity to the train station at Clongriffin and along the proposed Core Bus Corridor.
  • Provision for a post primary school site located at Belmayne Avenue and Main Street and adjacent to the greenway which links to Father Collins Park.
  • Reserve a school site at Clongriffin, subject to the requirements of the Department of Education and Skills.
  • Facilitate the relocation of allotments from the Belmayne Main Street site to a suitable location in the area.

Height

  • Building heights shall respond to the proposed urban structure and land uses and activities. In general, the KUV centres at Belmayne Town Centre and Clongriffin Train Station shall contain the greatest building heights, in order to reinforce their status as a KUV, subject to amenity and design safeguards.
  • Gateway buildings form a key structuring element, enhancing legibility and avoiding the proliferation of monolithic heights. As such, locally higher buildings shall be located within the KUV along the Belmayne-Belcamp link, as illustrated.
  • The following building heights shall be applied:
    • Minimum heights of 5 storeys to the Key Urban Village centres at Clongriffin Rail Station and Belmayne Town Centre at the R139/R107 junction.
    • Minimum heights of four to five storeys for Main Street Boulevard.
    • A locally higher building adjacent to the rail station and at the junction of Malahide Road / R152.
  • Any proposed height must have regard to existing neighbourhoods and character, in order to protect residential and visual amenity.

Design

  • Architectural treatment shall be of the highest quality and allow for a range of building types and designs, creating a visually coherent urban form.
  • Opportunities exist to establish a new architectural language in Belcamp that is distinct from Belmayne and Northern Cross, in order to enhance the legibility of the area.

Green Infrastructure

  • The Belmayne-Belcamp Green link and River Mayne Greenway / linear park will provide key strategic green links connecting the SDRA to surrounding areas, enhancing the biodiversity value of existing green infrastructure, while integrating SUDS features.
  • Existing hedgerows on the Phase 6 LAP lands form important biodiversity corridors and shall be retained and incorporated into the public realm of any future development proposals.
  • Tree planting, landscaping and SuDS features will be integrated into the urban structure and movement framework for the SDRA lands. Key green links shall provide additional landscaping in order to accentuate their strategic importance as amenity, sustainable movement and biodiversity corridors.
  • All future developments shall comply with the SuDS Strategy outlined in the 2020 Masterplan.

Figure 13-1:     SDRA 1 Clongriffin/Belmayne and Environs

Figure 13.1


13.4   SDRA 2 – Ballymun

Introduction

Ballymun has been the focus of a significant development and regeneration process since 1997 when it was decided to demolish the local authority flat blocks and to carry out an extensive regeneration process addressing the physical, social and economic needs of the area. The Ballymun Masterplan which was produced in 1998 by Ballymun Regeneration Ltd., set out the key aims and objectives for this regeneration process in consultation with the local community.

Over a period of 17 years, Ballymun Regeneration Ltd. oversaw the delivery of many key regeneration milestones including new homes for all residents of the flat blocks, new private housing, the construction of a new Main Street with new improved linkages throughout the area, new community facilities, hotels, an arts centre, new parks etc. Following the dissembling of the regeneration company a total of c. 33 ha of land remains undeveloped in the Ballymun City Council administrative area.

Recognising the significant levels of undeveloped land, the 2016-2022 Dublin City Development Plan designated Ballymun a Strategic Development and Regeneration Area. This was followed in 2017 by the adoption of the Ballymun Local Area Plan, providing a local  six year statutory plan for the area.

Significant progress has been achieved in implementing the LAP including the completion/ near completion of five sites totalling c. 5.8 ha providing new affordable and social housing; student housing and retail on the Main Street; and new enhanced linkages at Hampton Woods. The remaining sites have the capacity to deliver c. 1,700 new housing units, new commercial and employment opportunities having regard to compact growth principles, development of infill sites and intensification of development along the proposed new Metrolink route. Remaining development sites will be guided by the Local Area Plan for Ballymun and the high level guiding principles set out below.

Urban Structure

  • To develop the remaining vacant sites in a sustainable manner and to create distinctive urban places through the use of intelligent urban design and good quality materials having regard to the existing palette of materials and finishes in the area.
  • To complete outstanding infrastructure to enhance connectivity both within Ballymun and to the surrounding area, and to service the remaining development sites.

Land Use & Activity

  • To develop the remaining residential sites for a mix of house types and tenures to increase the population, promote social inclusion and integration and support the existing services and business in the area.
  • To attract economic activity and stimulate new employment generating uses within the three key areas of employment; (i) M50 lands, (ii) Main Street and (iii) Industrial Estates, alongside the local level provision operating within the neighbourhood centres.
  • To consolidate existing social and community facilities; existing sports and recreation facilities; and open space areas to maximise their use by the whole community.

Height

The height strategy set out within the Ballymun Local Area Plan 2017 was based on the parameters of the 2016-2022 Dublin City Development Plan, which identified Ballymun as an area suitable for mid-rise development of up to 50m. The LAP in turn provided height guidance for each individual site based on principles of sustainable development and strong urban design parameters. Following publication of the Department’s Urban Design and Building Heights: Guidelines for Planning Authorities, 2018, the guidance for height set out in LAP has been reviewed to determine if scope exists for additional height in this area. This review identified opportunities for additional height within Site 31 of the LAP and Site 1 (shopping centre site), at the corner of Balbutcher Lane North and the R108, as identified within the SDRA map. Elsewhere within the LAP area, the approach to building height and density, particularly in proximity to the Main Street and quality public transport remains appropriate in the current context. Key principles include:

  • To provide building heights in keeping with the height guidance set out for each individual site of the Ballymun Local Area Plan 2017.
  • To provide an appropriate urban Main Street context with heights of 6 storeys (c. 18m) directly to Main Street, with potential for locally higher buildings in the vicinity of the metrolink rail station. As blocks turn away from the Main Street, opportunities for some additional height may be considered having regard to the prevailing context.
  • To allow for an additional locally higher building on the corner of Balbutcher Lane North and the R108.

Design

  • To implement the urban form and design objectives set out in Section 5.5 of the Ballymun Local Area Plan 2017.

Green Infrastructure

  • To provide and maintain landscaped parks, greens and tree lined streets respecting the established public parks principles.
  • To continue to implement the Surface Water Masterplan for Ballymun facilitating development of the vacant sites.

Welcome to Ballymun


Figure 13-2:     SDRA 2 Ballymun

Figure 13.2

 

13.5   SDRA 3 – Finglas Village Environs and Jamestown Lands

Introduction

Finglas Village and Environs and Jamestown Lands have been designated as a Strategic Development and Regeneration Area (SDRA) due to the strategic location of the area, the proposed new public transport network and the extent of available lands suitable for regeneration. The designation of the area as a SDRA seeks:

  • To support the economic revitalisation of Finglas Village.
  • To provide for more varied and intense mix of uses within the Dublin Metropolitan Area.
  • To maximise the potential of a well-connected but underutilised brownfield area located adjacent to the proposed Luas green line extension to Finglas, and proposed Finglas Core Bus Corridor.

The Jamestown lands, located to the immediate north of the village, at 43.1 hectares, are currently used for a range of low density employment and other uses, with a high level of underutilisation and a number of vacant sites. They have been identified as having significant potential for regeneration and providing new brownfield redevelopment within the city, proximate to existing services and planned high quality public transport investment.

A number of key development opportunity sites exist in the village with potential to implement urban design improvements by capitalising and building on existing assets in order to develop a distinct spatial and cultural identity for the area.

Specific guiding principles are set out for both Finglas Village Environs and the Jamestown Lands and a detailed Guiding Principles Map for the area is included in this SDRA (see Figure 13-3). Some opportunity sites may require a change of zoning to facilitate development.

A:       FINGLAS VILLAGE ENVIRONS

Urban Structure

  • New developments in the village and environs to create enclosure and form active frontages with the streetscape.
  • The SDRA Guiding Principles Map identifies a number of development opportunity sites and illustrates indicative key building frontages that respond to the existing street and block structure. The development of a fine urban grain is necessary in order to enhance permeability. The built form to limit the use of set-backs, in order to create a strong street edge and sense of enclosure.
  • The bulk, scale and massing of buildings should respect and respond to the site-specific context, including historic building stock and archaeological features.
  • Key village gateways or arrival points are identified as a fundamental part of the overall urban design strategy and as a tool to re-define the village core. These gateways will reinforce the function and status of the village, enhance the townscape and improve the overall image of Finglas.
  • The SDRA Guiding Principles Map identifies public realm projects and urban plazas that will enhance the legibility and townscape, and foster the creation of identity. Key spaces include: a proposed village ‘Triangle’ as the primary civic space and focal point for the village; a new civic plaza at St. Canice’s Graveyard on Church Street; and a new plaza at Cardiffsbridge Road, as illustrated in the SDRA Guiding Principles Map (Figure 13.3).
  • Enhanced pedestrian movement and accessibility underpin the urban design strategy illustrated in the SDRA Guiding Principles Map. Proposed enhancements to routes and proposed new connections should respond to desire lines and include landscaping and tree planting. Barriers to such movement, including existing pedestrian bridges over the Finglas Road are considered significant challenges to achieving a cohesive urban structure. As such, the feasibility of replacing such pedestrian bridges with at-grade crossings will be actively explored and aligned with Bus Connects and Luas Finglas proposals.

Land Use & Activity

  • The SDRA Guiding Principles Map identifies a number of key development opportunity sites which would play a key role in the creation of a viable commercial centre for Finglas and in fostering the economic revitalisation of the village. Central to this overall strategy is the recognition that mixed use development in the village will be sought, including new residential development in order to maintain and grow the critical mass necessary to support the continued economic viability of the village, while supporting proposed investment in public transportation.
  • Encouraging increased pedestrian activity in public spaces, streets and parks is considered a priority and a key element to a placemaking strategy. In order to achieve this, a diversification of land use is required.
  • A range of housing typologies will be required throughout the village environs, to include sheltered housing in proximity to key amenities and services, in order to foster the creation of a sustainable mixed community and support the consolidation of the village.
  • Retail/commercial and housing uses throughout the village shall be complemented by key community and civic infrastructure including a new primary care centre, library and other community and cultural facilities.
  • A Conservation Plan for the St. Canice’s site shall be prepared and implemented, which will consider the restoration of the Abbey, and a feasibility study prepared to explore the development of a heritage centre (possibly in combination with an Arts Centre), while safeguarding the protected setting of the site.
  • The provision of culture/ artists’ workspaces and live work units shall be explored via a feasibility study.

Height

  • Proposed building heights shall respond to the prevailing scale and grain of the building stock, relate to the width of streets and respond to unique site characteristics such as topography and aspect. Height shall also relate to function and as such, should be considered as part of the wider environs. Amplified height may be appropriate in certain locations as identified in the Guiding Principles Map.
  • In general, building heights in the range of 3-6 storeys, will be encouraged in order to provide a coherent street structure with an appropriate sense of enclosure, while responding to the existing character of the village.
  • Particular focus shall be given to the roofscape when considering new development opportunities throughout the village. Monolithic heights should be avoided. Roofscapes can also have a vital role in enhancing the legibility of the area and in particular for accentuating key corners and intersections.
  • All planning applications for site redevelopments in the village shall be required to submit a design statement which considers height and roofscape, in the context of its setting.

Design

  • The appearance of the streetscape and public realm is a vital component to how people experience public space. Street clutter, an uncoordinated approach to street furniture, poor quality pavement and materials and extensive unsightly wirescape, all detract from the visual amenity of the village. Improvements to the streetscape and public realm will be actively encouraged and explored.
  • As part of public realm enhancements and as part of any potential redevelopment of key sites in the village, consideration shall be given to the relaying of services underground.

Green Infrastructure

  • A key green infrastructure route shall be accommodated along the line of the proposed Finglas Luas route, linking the Jamestown lands in the north to Tolka Valley Park in the south.
  • Tributaries of the Finglas and Finglaswood Rivers shall be protected and enhanced where feasible.
  • All opportunities to enhance existing green infrastructure shall be explored.
  • Enhanced tree planting along key streets shall be actively sought.

B:       JAMESTOWN LANDS

To ensure that the development of the subject lands occurs in a sustainable and coherent manner, a masterplan shall be prepared for the Jamestown lands by all major landowners, which complies with the guiding principles above, to be agreed with the Planning Authority, before the lodgement of any planning application. Consultation on the masterplan shall take place with key stakeholders including Fingal County Council, the Eastern and Midland Regional Assembly, the National Transport Authority, Transport Infrastructure Ireland, Irish Water, the Department of Education and Skills, and others as necessary to ensure that supporting infrastructure delivery for these lands and the immediate surrounding area is coordinated sustainably and comprehensively. The Masterplan will be presented to the North West Area Committee and made available for public comment.

All planning applications in the Jamestown lands of this SDRA will be required to comply with the Masterplan and the guiding principles outlined above. Minor deviations will only be considered where the change supports the implementation of the principles and provides an improved solution.

This Masterplan shall detail how it will deliver the guiding principles outlined below, and will not be limited to, but shall include the following details:

  • Agreed approach to the public realm and street design, including details on how the development will integrate with the existing streetscape along St. Margaret's Road / McKee Avenue and Jamestown Road.
  • Agreed approach for housing delivery on the lands.
  • Prepare a local Housing Needs Demand Assessment (HNDA) for the SDRA which identifies parameters that shall address:
    • Mix
    • Affordability
    • Social/affordable housing
    • Housing for vulnerable groups
  • Demonstrate the incorporation of a range of housing typologies, and avoid the over-proliferation of a single housing tenure in any one character area, to create a sustainable community.
  • A Green Infrastructure Strategy that provides for:
    1. retention of existing open watercourses with an appropriate riparian zone
    2. the exploration of opportunities to de-culvert existing watercourses and their incorporation into the Masterplan where possible,
    3. extensive tree planting including along  street avenues;
    4. biodiversity planting;
    5. play.
  • An Integrated Surface Water Management Strategy for the entire Jamestown development lands shall be prepared to ensure necessary public surface water infrastructure and nature based SuDS solutions are in place to service new development and shall include a modelling exercise to determine the extent of existing flood zones.
  • Future developments on the subject lands shall allow for the control of outflow to the River Tolka, with surface water discharges limited to 0-2l/s/ha for the 1 in 100-year storm event, including an additional 20-30% to allow for climate change.
  • A Mobility Management Strategy (MMS) shall be prepared for the subject lands and inform the preparation of the masterplan. The MMS shall:
    1. Promote the principle of filtered permeability to provide a competitive advantage for users of sustainable modes and restrict private cars through trips.
    2. Identify the location of a number of modal filters to enable pedestrians, cyclists, and public transport access, but restrict private car access.
    3. Seek high quality, well-lit and safe pedestrian/cycling link connecting the Jamestown lands to Finglas Village via Gofton Hall.
  • The Planning Authority will engage with the NTA concerning the planning and design of Luas Finglas. This ongoing engagement shall inform the Masterplan for these lands.
  • The requirement for a Traffic Impact Assessment will be determined on a case by case basis by the Planning Authority, in respect of planning applications lodged for the subject lands.
  • All new multiple unit and commercial developments are encouraged to be district heating enabled and must demonstrate how they comply with national and development plan policies on climate change and renewable energy.
  • Each planning application shall submit a statement demonstrating how the proposal accords with the guiding principles established in the SDRA and how it complies with the Masterplan.
  • It is anticipated that the re-development of the subject lands will occur incrementally and over an extended period. As such all development proposals shall occur sequentially and contiguous to existing residential development.
  • The masterplan shall include detailed information on the delivery of the new community facilities identified in the SDRA. The community space shall extend over the entire ground floor of the designated block and shall be completed to full fit out standard so it is enabled for immediate use for community purposes. Proposed uses for the space shall be agreed with DCC, informed by a community audit, carried out by the applicant.

Guiding Principles for the Jamestown Lands

Urban Structure

  • The proposed urban structure provides a strategic blueprint for the future development of the Jamestown lands, identifying key connections, public open spaces, and building frontages that will inform an urban design-led approach to the regeneration of this strategic area.
  • The movement framework and street structure, as illustrated in the SDRA Guiding Principles Plan (Figure 13.3), introduces permeability through the lands, based on proposed key east-west and north-south links and several proposed local access streets. A strategic pedestrian/cycle amenity link crosses the lands, which is aligned with key desire lines to the proposed Luas extension and forms part of the green infrastructure network, providing a key link between proposed open spaces.
  • The movement framework provides a structure for urban blocks and open spaces. The proposed urban block structure provides a coherent framework for future developments that can respond to a range of uses and activities. In accordance with best practice principles, urban blocks shall generally be between 60m-80m in size but shall not be more than 100m in width/length to ensure that an optimal level of permeability is achieved at an appropriate scale.
  • The SDRA Guiding Principles Plan identifies indicative key building frontages, within the proposed urban block structure. In general, built form shall limit the use of set-backs on the key internal links, are required to provide a tree planted verge and quality footpath, and, where appropriate, privacy strips, to form an edge with the streetscape, provide animation and passive surveillance. Exceptions shall apply, where required to facilitate the Luas and also for the existing boundary roads at Jamestown and McKee Avenue / St. Margaret’s Road, where the set-back shall be provided to

    (i) protect the amenities of the single and two storey houses opposite;

    (ii) ensure an enhanced urban realm with tree planting along the full extent of the boundary and

    (iii) to accommodate an off road cycle track to link to the village and other amenities and services. Building frontages shall respond to the movement framework and street hierarchy and address all key streets, which will enhance legibility and ensure that a strong sense of enclosure with tree lined streets is achieved throughout the SDRA.

Land Use & Activity

  • The area will primarily support residential and employment-generating uses, complemented by community, education, and public open space, and shall be developed at an approximate ratio (gross) of:
    • 50% residential;
    • 30% employment/commercial;
    • 10% public open space and;
    • 10% community/education.
  • Assuming an average density of 100 units per hectare this land bank has the potential to deliver an indicative c. 2,220 residential units.
  • Having regard to the lands’ proximity to Finglas Village and Charlestown, and the overall aim to support the revitalisation of commercial activity in the village, retail development will be limited throughout the SDRA lands. Retail will only be considered, at an appropriate scale to support local communities, in proximity to the Luas corridor, to the north-west of the lands.
  • A range of housing typologies will be required throughout the SDRA, to serve the existing and future population of the area. All character areas shall avoid the over-proliferation of any single housing typology. Having regard to the size, scale, and location of the subject lands, this is to ensure that the future development of sites are sustainable and contains mixed communities.
  • The SDRA Guiding Principles Map has identified three character areas, based on the above analysis.

The Village Character Area

  • The village character area is contiguous to Finglas village and is adjacent to existing residential properties. This character area shall be developed at an approximate ratio of 70% residential (gross) and 30% employment/commercial (gross) to foster the creation of a sustainable community that can support the economic revitalisation of Finglas village.
  • The scaling of development in this area must be sympathetic to the adjoining housing, lower in scale and net density (range of 60-90 units per hectare), and accommodate a range of unit types.

Luas Character Area

  • The lands to the north-west are situated within the walking catchment of the proposed Luas green line extension (Luas Finglas) and proposed Bus Connects Core Bus Corridor.
  • These lands shall be developed at an approximate ratio of 70% residential (gross) and 30% employment/commercial (gross), complemented by education, community, and open space, at an appropriate scale and density (with a net density range of 80-120 units per hectare) to support and avail the proposed public transport infrastructure and the development of a sustainable and compact urban form.

Jamestown Road Character Area

  • The lands situated to the north-east, along Jamestown Road, shall be developed at an approximate ratio of 70% employment/commercial (gross) and 30% residential (gross), to support the continuation of a sustainable working community in the area. Net densities for residential plots will have a range of 80-100 units per hectare.

Note: deviations in use mix and in relation to density ranges of up to 10% within individual sites and quarters to meet design requirements will be accepted if the change supports overall compliance with the guiding principles, and where a joint agreement is proposed between landowners to accommodate certain uses within a particular area, such will be considered where the overall principles are retained and the use and typology mix is delivered.

Height

  • The SDRA Guiding Principles Map identifies opportunities for additional building height on corners/façades of certain proposed urban blocks and potential locally higher buildings, as a tool to enhance urban design and legibility. A masterplan shall be required for the Jamestown lands which will establish and detail an overall height strategy.
  • Notwithstanding this, in general, building heights in the range of 4-6 storeys will be encouraged in order to provide a coherent street of structure, with an appropriate sense of enclosure.
  • Where opportunities for locally higher buildings are identified, this shall be to enhance the overall urban structure in a coherent way, e.g. at prominent corners, to close vistas, or as features, and shall not apply to the overall block. This is to avoid the proliferation of monolithic ‘slab’ blocks. Additional height, where appropriate, should be no more than 1/3 of the overall length/width of the urban block.
  • Height shall respond to the existing context and respect existing residential properties along McKee Avenue, Jamestown Road and St. Margaret’s Court. Having regard to the proposed Luas, in general, there is potential for locally higher buildings towards the north-west of the lands, subject to design and amenity safeguards.
  • Opportunities for additional height also exist to frame the proposed centrally located open space and to enhance the legibility of the built environment.

Design

  • The existing established residential amenity of properties along Jamestown Road, McKee Avenue, and St. Margaret’s Road shall be respected. As such, the masterplan will be required to demonstrate integration with the surrounding streetscapes. Opportunities exist to upgrade the streetscape along Jamestown Road, McKee Avenue, and St. Margaret’s Road, by providing a high-quality public realm and landscaping.
  • The masterplan shall also address the interface to the adjoining Fingal County Council employment lands to the north of the lands, in terms of protecting and enhancing visual and residential amenity. Opportunities for additional connections shall be explored.
  • Architectural design and form shall respond to the identified character areas to enhance legibility and provide visual interest. As such, Dublin City Council will strongly encourage architectural variety in terms of design, materials, and finishes. It shall be a requirement of the masterplan that architectural design, materials, and finishes be detailed, and correspond to the identified character areas in the SDRA.

Green Infrastructure

  • The green infrastructure and open space network forms a key structuring element to the SDRA Guiding Principles Map. As such, a Green Infrastructure Strategy must be prepared and agreed with DCC prior to any planning application being lodged. This Strategy must provide for the retention of existing open watercourses with an appropriate riparian zone and include the de-culverting of existing watercourses as part of the design.
  • The masterplan must address the integration of Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS), utilising an integrated nature based solutions response and not rely on hard infrastructure (storage) as the dominant solution.
  • The masterplan must set out a play strategy, setting out what active sports and play will be provided for within the larger open space, and how the needs of younger children will be accommodated within each local area.
  • All vehicular streets and green links shall be planted with an avenue of trees along their length, and on the landscaped set-back for Jamestown and McKee Roads.
  • Planting and landscaping must be framed on a policy of promoting biodiversity, with a high proportion of native species and those which support this aim, and specific areas of parkland identified for biodiversity purposes.
Figure 13-3:     SDRA 3 Finglas Village Environs and Jamestown Lands

Figure 13.3

Photo of blue bridge

 

13.6   SDRA 4 – Park West/Cherry Orchard

Introduction

An urban framework plan was originally prepared for the Park West/ Cherry Orchard area in 2002 focusing on vacant lands in the vicinity of the new train station. While an initial wave of construction delivered developments such as new housing at Cedar Brook, Barnville and Park West Point as well as new amenities at Cherry Orchard Park, the Equine Centre and the Plaza neighbourhood centre; the subsequent economic recession resulted in a slowdown in construction activity leaving some of these new developments relatively isolated, and left c. 46 ha of vacant lands in the area.

The significant levels of land available for development led to the identification of Park West- Cherry Orchard as an SDRA in the 2016-2022 Dublin City Development Plan, and guided the preparation of a new Local Area Plan for this area, which came into effect on the 4th November 2019. This LAP is a six year plan, with the option to extend the time period to 2029. A key focus of the LAP is the integration of new development sites with the existing and expanding community in order to create a sustainable and integrated neighbourhood.

Eight key development sites are identified with the capacity to deliver in the order of 2,500 - 3,100 new residential units alongside new employment and retail opportunities, with higher densities focused on the railway station which is planned to be upgraded to an electrified DART line. The plan also supports the delivery of two key amenity sites at Cherry Orchard Park and Gallanstown Waterworks, linked via a strategic green infrastructure network.

The key guiding principles set out below reflect the guiding principles of the LAP and are as follows:

Urban Structure

  • Develop the remaining sites in the area in a sustainable manner to create a vibrant sustainable new (neighbourhood) urban area that is fully integrated and connected with the existing community.
  • Enhance accessibility and connectivity both within the Park West - Cherry Orchard area and to the surrounding areas to service the remaining development sites.
  • Promote sustainable modes of transport by making them convenient and attractive (including walking and cycling) through the implementation of a well-connected, permeable, coherent street network with high levels of accessibility to an integrated public transport network with improved infrastructure to maximise its potential use.
  • Ensure timely provision and investment in infrastructure including water and drainage provision, public transport, telecommunications network etc.to support new development opportunities.
  • To develop Park West Cherry Orchard in an integrated, sustainable way that will ensure the local community benefits from investment, greater infrastructure and services.

Land Use & Activity

  • Ensure the Local Area Plan delivers private, council and affordable housing, schools, sports and recreational facilities, retail facilities and employment opportunities in consultation with local community and youth services.
  • Deliver new residential units in a mix of unit types and tenures to cater for people across all spectrums of their lifecycle, with higher densities sought in proximity to the railway station.
  • Create a local neighbourhood focal point within Cherry Orchard neighbourhood enhancing existing services and amenities, and providing new local retail provision.
  • Create a new commercial destination in the vicinity of the train station, with mixed use and supermarket provision, together with landmark buildings and civic spaces.
  • Enhance existing open space areas and develop a connected network of green spaces and green infrastructure to maximise their potential use by the existing and future generations.
  • Support opportunities and initiatives which promote education and aim to address unemployment supporting economic activity through the provision of existing and future services and businesses in the area.
  • Support and facilitate the provision of additional school places to serve the existing and emerging communities.
  • Support and facilitate the development of a Community and Social Enterprise Hub.
  • Support the provision of mixed-employment uses in proximity to the M50 boundary.
  • Consolidate and improve the existing sports and recreation facilities and promote the provision of new recreational facilities.

Height

  • Provide building heights in keeping with the height guidance set out for each individual site of the Park West – Cherry Orchard Local Area Plan 2019.
  • Allow for limited locally higher buildings in the vicinity of the Train Station, in keeping with the LAP objectives and site briefs.

Design

  • Implement the urban form and design strategy set out in Section 4.6 of the Park West – Cherry Orchard Local Area Plan 2019.
  • Improve the appearance and image of the area and create a content, caring and vibrant sustainable community which integrates the new community with the existing established community.
  • Underground overhead ESB pylons wherever possible to enhance the urban form of this part of the city.

Green Infrastructure

  • To protect and promote the natural and built heritage of the area and provide a network of well-maintained parks and civic spaces connected by tree lined streets taking the opportunity to incorporate best practice SuDS infrastructure as appropriate.
  • Support the aims and objectives of the Water Framework Directive for the Camac River Catchment, particularly in relation to hydromorphology and improvements in water quality and the streams that drain the LAP lands.
  • To provide for water attenuation capabilities within the redesign of Cherry Orchard Park.

Park with cherry trees

 
Figure 13-4:     SDRA 4 Park West/Cherry Orchard

Figure 13.4

 

13.7   SDRA 5 – Naas Road

Introduction

A Local Area Plan (LAP) for the Naas Road lands was adopted by the City Council on 14 January 2013. The plan was extended for a further 5 years in 2018 and will expire in January 2023. The plan area covers approximately 100 hectares and contains a number of major brownfield sites. It occupies a strategic location on a gateway point into the city with good public transportation links to the wider metropolitan area.

The overall vision for this area set out in the 2013 LAP is as follows:

‘To create a great place to work and live, and create a new urban identity for the Naas Road lands area plan by regenerating existing developed lands as a sustainable mixed-use area, capitalising on the area’s locational advantages and improving the relationship of the lands to their immediate surroundings through improved linkages, green infrastructure and permeability. As part of this transformation, there will be an increase in the range of land-uses, and improvements in the visual environment, resulting in an increase in street level activity and the general revitalisation of the area.’

The plan contains three remaining key re-development sites, namely:

  • Royal Liver Retail Park
  • Motor Distributors Ltd site (Volkswagen factory)
  • Nissan plant site

Linking the re-development of these sites into the wider surrounding environment, and creating sustainable successful communities is central to the successful regeneration of this SDRA.

It should be noted that since the adoption of the LAP, there have been changes in the national planning context via the introduction of Ministerial Guidelines relating to height and apartment standards. The key sites identified in the area have been the subject of planning activity in recent years, with permission for c.3,000 units in the vicinity of the Naas Road/Kylemore Road junction.

It is also noted that the wider Naas Road lands area, incorporating parts of Park West and lands in South Dublin County Council, are the subject of a masterplanning process funded under the Urban Regeneration and Development Fund (URDF) programme. It is anticipated that this will result in a wider statutory plan coming forward that will supersede the LAP in the coming years, and may, if appropriate, inform a variation to the development plan.

Guiding Principles for Key Opportunity Sites

The Naas Road LAP provides guidance in relation to the development of the key opportunity sites 1-5 below, of which the key site specific issues updated and summarised below with said objectives being part of this SDRA going forward.

1 – Royal Liver
  • To encourage the sustainable redevelopment of this key site as part of the mixed-use core of the Key Urban Village containing mainly office and residential uses with local scale retail and service uses. To provide for a boulevard leading to a pocket park and pedestrian and cycling connections through the site to increase connectivity and deliver the green infrastructure network of the LAP.
  • To provide for a sustainable approach to height within the site, with buildings addressing the Naas Road and Kylemore Road providing a strong building line with appropriate heights, marked at the corner with a landmark building of up to 17 storeys. Within the site, heights will be at sustainable level, appropriate to the uses proposed.
  • Require setbacks to be agreed with Dublin City Council along the main road frontages at Naas Road, along the east side of Kylemore Road to facilitate upgrading of the road to provide for a bus lane, segregated cycleway, greening of the route and footpaths allowing for an attractive and vibrant street environment and to encourage pedestrian and cyclist activity.
2. Motor Distributors Site
  • Facilitate the sustainable redevelopment of this key site with a fine urban grain and a mix of uses as part of the mixed-use core of the Key Urban Village all at sustainable densities within a vibrant and interesting environment and integrating with the wider plan area and the administrative area of South Dublin County Council directly adjoining.
  • Require a general height of between 6 and 8 storeys fronting onto Walkinstown Avenue, Longmile Road, Robinhood Road. There is potential for one to two mid -rise buildings (up to 50m) within the site but any development in the immediate vicinity of the protected structure should protect the special character of the protected structure and its setting.
  • The height of new development along Naas Road, directly adjacent to the protected structure, should protect the special character of the protected structure and should be no more than 4 storeys in height immediately proximate to the building.
  • Require setbacks along the west side of Walkinstown Avenue and north side of Long Mile Road to facilitate widening of the road to provide for a bus lane, segregated cycleway and footpath allowing for an attractive and vibrant street environment and to encourage pedestrian and cyclist activity.
  • Facilitate landuses that introduce active frontages and enliven the streets along Walkinstown Avenue, Long Mile Road and along priority pedestrian routes running through the site. Such uses may include local services such as retail, cafes, restaurants, leisure, cultural and community uses, reception areas to commercial areas above and other complementary active uses. Design of all units at street level should have a strong urban edge, convey openness and contribute to vibrancy in the public realm.
  • Require the provision of a flexible and publicly accessible facility for community and cultural uses, and for any development proposal to include a community and cultural audit. Dublin City Council will, in consultation with local stakeholders, identify suitable uses for the facility. The form, size and other details of this/these space(s) shall be designed in consultation with Dublin City Council and will become part of the resources of Dublin City Council to support community and cultural activities in the city.
  • Require the provision of a pocket park/performances space.
  • Retain the Volkswagen premises (protected structure ref. 5792) as a landmark and formal entry point to the city and ensure the enhancement and protection of the special interest and character of the structure in any refurbishment, adaption or reuse; regard to be had to Dublin City Council’s upcoming guidelines on protection and refurbishment of buildings of the late twentieth century once published.
  • Improve views of the Volkswagen Premises (protected structure ref. 5792) from the Naas Road by incorporating a strategically placed pedestrian access point into the northern boundary treatment of the site, incorporating a redesign of landscaping and an appropriate lighting scheme. This pedestrian point should allow for easy access to nearby bus stops and the Kylemore Luas stop.
  • Provide for a predominantly pedestrian and cyclist-orientated environment at street level. The majority of car parking shall be provided at basement or at under-croft levels provided such under-croft parking does not undermine the objective to provide for active street frontages. A limited amount of well-designed car parking shall be facilitated at surface level subject to good design, integration with the street and broken up with landscaping and/or street furniture.
  • Provide for a clearly defined arrangement of public spaces which integrate into the emerging pedestrian / green routes and cycle network for the plan area and beyond and that increases permeability throughout the site by incorporating clearly defined east-west and north-south pedestrian and cyclist-friendly routes through the site framed by buildings on both sides and containing active street level uses along these pedestrian routes allowing for passive supervision.
  • Provide for a boulevard traversing the core of the site in an east-west direction integrating with the boulevard to be provided on that key site to the east of Walkinstown Avenue (the Nissan site). This space shall accommodate pedestrian, cyclist and vehicular movement but will be so designed so as to prioritise pedestrian and cyclist movement. This boulevard shall incorporate street art, furniture and planting, SuDS and shall be an attractive space for relaxation. The boulevard shall be overlooked by residential units on some upper levels and fine grain neighbourhood-level retail units, cafes, cultural uses and other complementary uses at ground floor levels.
  • Assist in promoting modal shift to sustainable modes of transport by enhancing connections between the site and the Kylemore Luas and Dublin Bus stops by reserving road space for a setdown for buses on Walkinstown Avenue, by incorporating new pedestrian access points in boundaries of the site and provide for enhanced pedestrian crossings over the Naas Road, Walkinstown Avenue and Long Mile Road.
  • As part of the redevelopment of this site the 750mm watermain may need to be diverted. Such a diversion would be at the expense of the developer(s).
  • To retain existing mature trees and planting on this key site, in particular those trees along the site’s northern boundary and the tree line located in the southern section of the site, where feasible and appropriate.
3. Former Nissan Site
  • To facilitate the sustainable redevelopment of this key site with a fine urban grain and a mix of uses as part of the mixed-use core of the key urban village, all at sustainable densities within a vibrant and interesting environment and integrating with the wider plan area.
  • Require a general height of between 6 and 8 storeys fronting onto Walkinstown Avenue, Longmile Road and Naas Road; and two locally buildings of up to 15 storeys, one at the junction of Walkinstown Avenue and Long Mile Road, and one at the junction of Walkinstown Avenue and Naas Road.
  • Require setbacks (to be agreed with the planning department) along the main road frontages at Naas Road, along the east side of Walkinstown Avenue and north side of Long Mile Road to facilitate widening of the road to provide for a bus lane, segregated cycleway and footpath allowing for an attractive and vibrant street environment and to encourage pedestrian and cyclist activity.
  • Facilitate landuses that introduce active frontages along the Naas Road, Walkinstown Avenue and Long Mile Road, and priority pedestrian routes running through the site. Such uses may include local services such as retail, cafes, restaurants, leisure, cultural and community uses, reception areas to commercial areas above and other complementary active uses. Design of all units at street level should have a strong urban edge, convey openness and contribute to vibrancy in the public realm.
  • Require the provision of a flexible and publicly accessible facility for community and/or health uses and a crèche in any redevelopment of this site to serve the needs of the residents in the area.
  • Provide for a pedestrian and cyclist focused environment at street level. The majority of car parking serving commercial schemes shall be provided at basement or at undercroft levels provided such undercroft parking does not undermine the objective to provide active street frontages. A limited amount of well-designed car parking shall be facilitated at surface level (particularly within residential areas) subject to good design, integration with the street and with landscaping and/or street furniture.
  • Provide for a clearly defined arrangement of public spaces which integrate into the emerging pedestrian/green routes and cycle network for the plan area and beyond and that increases permeability throughout the site by incorporating clearly defined east-west and north-south pedestrian and cyclist friendly routes through the site framed by buildings on both sides and containing active street level uses along these pedestrian routes allowing for passive supervision.
  • Provide for boulevards traversing the large site in an east-west and north-south direction integrating with the local green links running through the site and integrating with the boulevard to be provided on the key site to the west of Walkinstown Avenue (the Motor Distributors site). This space shall incorporate street art, furniture and planting and SuDS, and shall be attractive space for relaxation. The boulevard shall be overlooked by residential and commercial on upper levels with ground levels dominated by retail units, cafes, cultural and/or community uses and other complementary uses.
  • Assist in promoting modal shift to sustainable modes of transport by enhancing connections between the site and the Kylemore Luas and Dublin Bus stops by providing for new pedestrian access points in all three boundaries of the site and providing for enhanced pedestrian crossings over the Naas Road and Walkinstown Avenue.
  • To green and improve the major road arteries surrounding this key site i.e. Naas Road, Walkinstown Avenue, and Long Mile Road, to include wider footpaths, additional tree lines (incorporating native species), soft landscape zones, additional pedestrian crossing points, and off road cycle routes.
  • To seek the undergrounding of the 110 KV and 38KV high voltage overhead cabling traversing the LAP area. The route for undergrounding the cables will be assessed by ESB Networks with the applicants/developers, and in that event the cost of the undergrounding of the lines including associated civil works would be borne by the developers and ESB.
  • To provide a new HV substation within the site, integrated with the undergrounding of cabling to meet the level of demand.
  • As part of the redevelopment of this site the 750mm watermain may need to be diverted. Such a diversion would be at the expense of the developer(s).

Two areas have been added to the SDRA boundary that are outside the LAP boundary and are indicated on the accompanying figure.

4 - Bluebell Avenue

It is considered that the two parcels of land, located on the northern and southern side of Bluebell Avenue, have the potential to deliver a mixed use development and that this should be the subject of a masterplanning process. The development of the northern portion of the site shall include an adequate setback from the Grand Canal and take account of the conservation zoning.

5 - Former Irish Water and Bluebell Road Regeneration Area

This c.2.8 Ha site currently accommodates the existing Bluebell Road maisonettes development as well as the former Irish Water site adjacent to the Grand Canal. The maisonette units have reached the end of their lifespan and require either retrofitting or rebuilding. The overall site has the potential to deliver a significant quantum of residential development, in association with the regeneration/redevelopment of the maisonettes site.

It is considered that given the scale of the site and the locational context that heights of up to 10 storeys could be delivered on the site subject to detailed design, conservation considerations and being in accordance with Appendix 3 of the development plan. A masterplan shall be developed for the site. The masterplan shall address, but not be limited to, the following areas:

  • Appropriate interaction with and consideration of the Grand Canal and associated conservation area.
  • Consideration of the industrial heritage merits of the filter beds.
  • The potential for the Luas extension to Lucan to be incorporated through the site.
  • The potential undergrounding or design mitigation of the existing ESB power lines on the western end of the site.
  • Identification of locations suitable for locally higher buildings.
  • The redevelopment of the Former Irish Water and Bluebell Road regeneration area will be informed by the Bluebell – A Framework for Renewal Plan.
Figure 13-5:     SDRA 5 Naas Road

Figure 13.5

 

13.8   SDRA 6 – Docklands

Introduction

This SDRA corresponds to the Dublin Docklands area as defined by the Dublin Docklands Development Authority Act, 1997. It extends to circa 520 hectares and has significant potential for further regeneration with a number of key development sites throughout the area. These sites can make a valuable contribution to the future physical and social regeneration of this part of the city, consolidating the area as a vibrant economic, residential, cultural and amenity quarter of the city, whilst simultaneously nurturing sustainable well-integrated neighbourhoods and communities.

There are two existing development frameworks that relate to the majority of this area, the North Lotts and Grand Canal Dock Planning Scheme and the Poolbeg West Planning Scheme. Remaining development sites will be informed by the guiding principles set out below.

Urban Structure

Given the variety of urban fabric within this SDRA, a focused approach is necessary, taking account of existing characteristics and regeneration opportunities. The objectives for urban structure within the existing SDZ areas are set out in the relevant planning schemes. These are supplemented by guidance for selected key development sites (see opportunity sites section below), located outside of the SDZ areas. These key development sites represent opportunities for the integration of new development, addressing such matters as permeability, building lines, heights and greening opportunities. This approach will ensure integration into the historic fabric of the city and create opportunities for increased interaction and mobility within the Docklands and the wider city, thus encouraging social cohesion.

The SDRA benefits from immediate proximity to the NEIC SDRA, an area for which guiding principles have also been prepared and in which various urban initiatives are being implemented.

Land Use and Activity

Given the scale and diversity of the Docklands area, future land uses will accord with the focused requirements of the relevant SDZ Planning Scheme, or (for remaining areas) the development plan zonings. The overall approach aims to encourage mixed use development in order to achieve a balance between residential and commercial uses, with other community and cultural uses encouraged throughout. Below are separate guiding principles relating to the following thematic areas: Housing, Social & Community Infrastructure, Education and Employment and Economic Activity.

Housing
  • To promote the expansion of the Docklands’ residential population, and the successful integration of residents and communities.
  • To ensure obligations under Part V and Dublin City Council’s housing strategy are met.
  • To provide physical, social and amenity infrastructure in tandem with new housing.
  • To ensure that residential developments work with the unique character of Docklands in terms of visual context, maritime location, heritage assets and community identity.
  • To promote a mix of house types and tenures to increase the population, promote social inclusion and integration and support the existing services and businesses in the area.
Social and Community Infrastructure

Social sustainability is central to the regeneration strategy for the Docklands area. Dublin City Council will actively pursue a community and social development agenda, integrating and connecting the Docklands communities. A Social Infrastructure Audit of the Docklands area (SDRA) conducted in 2015 was reviewed in 2017. This helps guide social and community development in the area. The Poolbeg West Planning Scheme was adopted since this audit and contains relevant objectives for the SDZ with regard to social and community infrastructure. Key guiding principles for the SDRA under this theme are:

  • To pro-actively engage and re-integrate the Docklands community with the full spectrum of Dublin City Council services, with particular regard to the Council’s community services which include children and young people, community development, social inclusion and interculturalism, community and voluntary, as well as public private partnerships of socio-economic interests.
  • To support recommendations of the document ‘Dublin’s Northeast Inner City – Creating Brighter Future’ insofar as it relates to the Docklands area, and also to support the recommendations of the ‘2017 Review of Dublin Docklands Social Infrastructure Audit 2015’.
  • To ensure co-ordination between the various statutory and non-statutory providers of social services and social programmes in the Docklands area.
  • To ensure that social and community facilities, in particular educational facilities, are provided in tandem with residential development, having regard to the over-arching social infrastructure audit and related 2017 update.
  • To require the provision of space in large-scale developments for social, cultural, creative and artistic purposes.
Education
  • To promote the provision of educational programmes for the local community in conjunction with third-level institutions, including the National College of Ireland, Trinity College Dublin and Technological University (TU) Dublin
  • To liaise with the Department of Education and Skills (DES) in supporting the important services provided by existing schools in the Docklands area, especially in relation to the pivotal role of schools in community development.
Employment & Economic Development

The Docklands area has witnessed significant economic development over the past number of years with noticeable growth in the financial, IT and professional services sectors. There has been significant spin-off benefits for the local community. The Eastside and Docklands Local Employment Services Report (2020) highlighted the importance of efforts to help align economic development with job opportunities for the unemployed through the provision of appropriate courses. Local employment will continue to be encouraged on construction projects and job placement programmes in local schools supported. In this regard, progress on educational attainment and local employment levels in the Docklands area will be monitored over time. Guiding principles for the area include:

  • To promote the Docklands as a location for sustainable businesses and supporting services and to support the marine economy.
  • To encourage innovation that supports sustainable economic development, including an innovation district on lands at Grand Canal Quay, to be developed by Trinity College.
  • To encourage local employment, where the appropriate skills are available, on all construction projects, and to promote a local schools job placement programme.
  • To promote sustainable tourism including cultural, recreational and business tourism. To also support Fáilte Ireland in implementing the aims of its Docklands Visitor Experience Development Plan (2020) including various projects promoting sustainable tourism.
  • To recognise the significance of Dublin Port Company’s non-statutory 2040 Masterplan, and related updates/reviews, as an important guiding document for the future of port lands.
  • To implement the non-statutory Water Animation Strategy for the NL&GCD SDZ (2018), and to ensure (working in conjunction with Dublin Port Company and Waterways Ireland) that the River Liffey remains navigable between the East Link Bridge and Samuel Beckett Bridge.
  • To support Smart Docklands in its work with the city, innovators and the universities, in progressing innovative technological solutions that can help transform how the city operates and improve quality of life.

Height

Existing building heights in the area vary considerably. Suitable heights for any given site are influenced by urban design principles with regard to existing built context, national guidelines, conservation issues and setting. In relation to the SDZs for North Lotts and Grand Canal Dock and Poolbeg West, specific height requirements apply as set out in the Planning Schemes, where heights are set out for individual city blocks or elements within them.

More generally for the SDRA area, Ministerial guidance published in 2018 has redefined a planned approach to building heights which is now to be implemented, and this SDRA has clear locational advantages that support some increased height in appropriate locations.

General height guidance is provided for selected key development sites in the SDRA, informed by urban design principles responsive to context. More specifically, appropriate locations for enhanced height within key sites are identified, with specific positions illustrated within indicative site layouts. These taller elements can contribute towards visual variety and help define an area’s character whilst avoiding significant negative impacts on amenities. They can also provide for greater architectural expression. For clarity, these taller elements can be up to one third taller than the dominant height of the main building, as measured from ground level. This additional height should be expressed vertically, and where forming part only of a larger building should not extend horizontally along the block such that its visual prominence is flattened.

In some more limited locations where the planning context is suitable, locally higher buildings of greater height and landmark buildings can be appropriate, and positions for these buildings are clearly described for key sites.

All new development of increased height compared to the existing context must accord with the specific performance criteria as set out in Appendix 3 of this development plan.

Design

For the SDZ areas, the matter of design is addressed in detail in the relevant statutory planning schemes. In the case of the NLGCD SDZ, a Public Realm Masterplan has also been completed along with a related public realm implementation guide (2018). Detailed design specifications are also set out for Poolbeg West in the Planning Scheme. In relation to the wider the SDRA area:

  • A high-quality public realm will be required and shall be applied to the network of streets and public spaces, with a focus on greening initiatives, maximising public open space availability, and improving connectivity and passive surveillance.
  • High-quality architectural design and building materials will be encouraged throughout the SDRA, as will visual variety.
  • Broad design parameters are set out, where appropriate, for the redevelopment of specific strategic opportunity sites set out below. A masterplan requirement will apply for some larger strategic sites.

Green Infrastructure

  • Support the implementation of the projects identified in the North East Inner City Greening Strategy that pertain to the Docklands area.
  • Provide for new streets as set out in the framework plan, accommodating an improved pedestrian environment, cycleways and green infrastructure/SuDS interventions.
  • Provide for a new park along the Royal Canal between Sheriff St. and Newcomen Bridge.
  • Promote greening initiatives in association with sustainable transport connections both to, and through the port area, improving connectivity to key destinations.
  • To promote the provision of public open space at locations within key development sites that are visible, accessible and inviting to the wider public.
  • Support green infrastructure/connectivity initiatives contained in the Ringsend and Irishtown LEIP and improve connectivity to Poolbeg West SDZ.
  • Provide for the creation of connected recreational and amenity spaces in Poolbeg that strengthen the biodiversity and ecology of the area, with a particular focus on Sean Moore Park and Irishtown Nature Park.
  • To promote and facilitate the delivery of the Port Greenway and to enhance the amenity of East Wall Road through tree planting, improved pedestrian facilities, and potential expansion of quality public realm.

Movement & Transport

  • To enhance public realm to accommodate increased pedestrian movement.
  • To support the upgrading of the Campshires to deliver an improved environment for cycling and walking, along with necessary flood relief works.
  • Facilitate the delivery of the sustainable transport initiatives identified, including new pedestrian and cycle bridges at specified locations in accordance with SMTO23 including:
    1. Bridge from North Wall Quay at Point Depot (Point Bridge) and the widening of Tom Clarke Bridge, improve pedestrian and cycling facilities at the crossing point as well as accommodating additional public transport routes in conjunction with the Dodder Bridge.
    2. Pedestrian/cycle bridge crossing the Liffey between the Samuel Beckett Bridge and the Tom Clarke Bridge.
  • To facilitate delivery of cycle routes identified in the NTA GDA Cycle Strategy.
  • To support the extension of LUAS light rail, a DART Interconnector and improvements to Irish Rail’s network including Dart+ projects.
  • To include an objective for the reservation for a public road linking the national road network at the Dublin Tunnel to serve the southern port lands and adjoining areas (Southern Port Access Route) in accordance with the NTA Transport Strategy for the Greater Dublin Area (2016 – 2035) and forthcoming review
  • To reconfigure Sean Moore Roundabout to a signalised junction and provide for greater accessibility of the Poolbeg West SDZ area with the city centre. This will seek to address issues of severance with the Ringsend area.
  • To improve sustainable transport connectivity both to and through the area of Dublin Port.
  • To support public realm improvements in East Wall to enhance permeability and connectivity to the wider area.
  • To support increased animation of water bodies in the NLGCD SDZ in co-operation with relevant agencies and stakeholders, through the identification of areas to be used for particular on-water uses.
  • To provide for a Luas stop and line on the south east side of the Sean Moore Road.

Implementation

A multidisciplinary team at DCC will continue to progress the implementation of policy and objectives for the Docklands area, working with relevant stakeholders and (DCC) Area Office staff, and monitoring progress and project phasing. In addition, the Docklands Oversight and Consultative Forum (DOCF) is a statutory body appointed by the Minister that may advise DCC and any Strategic Policy Committee on any Docklands related functions.

Outside the boundaries of the two SDZs there is a need to address continued socio-economic regeneration and urban integration. As part of this ongoing process, a series of large sites have been identified as having particular potential, and guiding principles have been set out to assist with their sustainable redevelopment and integration into the city fabric.

In relation to development elsewhere, there is merit in further work on other non-strategic sites and, therefore, it is recommended that the western part of the Docklands area that is included within the NEIC boundary be included in any future LAP for that area.

A Local Environmental Improvement Plan has been prepared for the Ringsend/Irishtown area. It sets out local improvement projects including works for Ringsend Library square and recommendations for various interconnecting linkages. In 2021, under the Urban Regeneration and Development Fund, funding was approved by the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage for works at Library Square, at Sean Moore Road/Roundabout and Cambridge Road. Redevelopment works at Ringsend Park are also approved.

Guidance for North Lotts and Grand Canal Dock and Poolbeg SDZ’s

North Lotts and Grand Canal Dock Planning Scheme 2014

The North Lotts and Grand Canal Dock (or NLGCD) Planning Scheme, adopted in 2014, sets out a holistic template for the sustainable development of this area (c. 22 ha) for a mix of commercial and residential uses. The Scheme also planned an integrated framework for new infrastructure such as bridges, parks and public spaces as well as the upgrading of the Campshires and animation of the river Liffey and canals.

Since the SDZ was adopted, significant progress has been made, with the majority of the vacant sites now either built out or under construction. At the time of writing, the only entire City Blocks where no development has taken place on foot of the Scheme are those numbered 9 and 18-20 inclusive. The quantum of commercial development either under construction or complete has now exceeded the indicative floor area set out for the overall Scheme. In addition, permission has been granted for 97% of the target number of residential units. New public spaces and streets have been provided in accordance with requirements and more are progressing. Significant specific objectives have been met for the area. These include:

  • The publication in 2017 of a Public Realm Masterplan for the SDZ area, and related public realm implementation guide (2018).
  • A 2017 review of the Dublin Docklands Social Infrastructure Audit (2015)
  • A water animation strategy (2018)

Significant progress has also been made in relation to infrastructure planning and design, and towards improved public realm. The Council will continue to work with the DOCF and all stakeholders towards the successful implementation of the Scheme.

Poolbeg West Planning Scheme 2019

In 2016, the Government designated 34 hectares of lands at Poolbeg West as a Strategic Development Zone. This area included brownfield lands such as the former Irish Glass Bottle site and also lands owned by Dublin Port.

In 2019, following extensive consultation with the local community and stakeholders, the Planning Scheme was approved by An Bord Pleanála. It plans in detail for an appropriate mix of housing in order to create a socially balanced community, designed to sustainable densities and served by quality amenities and services. Commercial/office uses are also accommodated, with scope for up to 100,000 sq. m. The overall scheme is designed to encourage active travel through the availability of quality public transport and new cycle infrastructure, with minimal planned car parking. District heating will help towards energy efficiency and climate change goals.

Improvements to road access arrangements are needed to facilitate these new land uses, with local upgrades and a planned new public transport bridge over the river Dodder. At a more strategic level, improved port access and the Eastern Bypass route reservation are also accommodated. Because of the scale of development envisaged, a clear phasing plan has been set out, such that infrastructural requirements are provided in tandem with appropriate levels of new development.

Detailed block-by block design guidance ensures an appropriate level of certainty and gives clarity on the location and extent of quality public realm, including parks, street layouts and coastal amenities.

Guiding Principles for Key Opportunity Sites

1 - Connolly Station

As a key public transport interchange in the city centre, Connolly Station and its immediate environment has regeneration potential to deliver an appropriate density of development integrated with improved access to the station from nearby streets, and also a new public open space for the community. This site has potential for enhanced scale and height. Redevelopment should deliver permeability through the site to the wider street network, with access from Sheriff St. Lower to Seville Place and Oriel St. Upper. A new pedestrian entrance to the station from Preston Street through an existing rail arch should link to a central concourse and to the wider pedestrian network should be provided. All connections must be universally designed.

Public open space should be located at the southern edge where it is visible, accessible and inviting to those approaching from either end of Sheriff St. Locally higher buildings can be accommodated at identified locations adjoining the railway lines where residential sensitivities are lower. The other identified locations for locally higher buildings are such that views from Oriel St. Upper and Oriel Hall will be filtered by lower rise development to the foreground. Development along Oriel Street Upper should be designed with own-door ground-floor access and should be responsive to the low-rise residential character of existing development located opposite.

Given the location of the site on a major public transport interchange, proposals for a landmark building/s will be considered in accordance with the criteria as set out in Appendix 3, Table 4.

A masterplan shall be prepared for the entire site, incorporating the above objectives. This masterplan should also address the following in appropriate detail:

  • Appropriate interface with CIE operations.
  • Access, servicing and parking strategy.
  • Approach to improved public realm along Sheriff Street.
  • Rationale for building heights throughout the scheme.
  • A Conservation Strategy for the arches, to include reopening of arches where possible, and conserved to an appropriate standard.
  • A housing element to incorporate an appropriate housing mix, taking account of local housing need.
2 - Site between 52 Oriel Street Lower, the Royal Canal Greenway and the canal rail bridge

Any development on this site should seek to engage with the canalside, and development here could act as a wayfinder along the Royal Canal Greenway. The northern end of the site is adequately removed from sensitive land-uses to accommodate a locally higher building exploiting canal-side views. The existing entrance to the site from Ossory Street Lower should be opened up to provide public access to the canalside and the associated greenway. All dwellings at ground floor level should have own-door access and those located along the north-eastern boundary, should be orientated towards the canal. Requirements of Irish Rail shall be adhered to in relation to the built footprint and necessary clearances.

3 - Shamrock Place

The development of this site could both contribute to the animation of the Royal Canal Greenway and provide some locally higher buildings, particularly at the northern or eastern end of the site. This would provide passive surveillance of the canal-side, while also being cognisant of its close proximity to a low-rise street of Z2-zoned properties. All dwellings at ground floor level should have own-door access and those located along the north-eastern and eastern boundaries should be orientated towards the canal.

4 - Ossory Industrial Estate

Redevelopment of this site should provide a setback from Ossory Road, enabling a widening of the road to facilitate an improved pedestrian and cycle environment. Locally higher buildings could be located at the western corner, acting as a visual cue for those traveling in both directions along Ossory Road and to/from the Royal Canal Greenway. Public access should be provided to the site directly convenient to a proposed a new pedestrian/cycle bridge crossing the canal and parallel to the rail line. All dwellings at ground floor (or street) level should have own-door access and those located along the south western boundary should be orientated towards the canal. Requirements of Irish Rail shall be adhered to in relation to built footprint and necessary clearances.

5 - Coady's Yard, Ossory Road

Redevelopment of this site should provide a setback from Ossory Road, enabling a widening of the road to facilitate an improved pedestrian and cycle environment. Own-door access to ground floor dwellings fronting Ossory Road, should also be provided. Requirements of Irish Rail shall be adhered to in relation to built footprint and necessary clearances.

6 - North Strand Fire Station/Former Readymix Site

A site of considerable strategic merit, located along a key movement corridor to the city centre and fronting the Tolka River and Fairview Park, this site provides an opportunity to accommodate a development of greater scale. Scheme design should carefully consider the residential amenities of existing properties on Leinster Avenue and Hope Avenue, which frame the site. Locally higher buildings located at the northern corner of the site could mark a key gateway into the inner city. Development should provide a strong edge to both street frontages while the North Strand frontage should accommodate non-residential uses at ground floor, promoting street activity and animation. A public pedestrian route through the scheme will interconnect an area of open space with the River Tolka, and this route should be of high amenity design, with the footway flanked by a landscaped green strip. All dwellings at ground floor level should have own-door access. Given the scale of this site, it is appropriate that a masterplan be prepared for the entire area to address the above matters in addition to planned phasing.

7 - Docklands Innovation Park

Redevelopment of this site should incorporate public open space along its north-western boundary where it can serve as an amenity and improved setting for the adjoining primary school and punctuate this long road. Development should be set back significantly from the south-eastern side boundary to provide for an improved interface with Merchant's Road and the residential dwellings opposite. Adequate space should be reserved along the south-western boundary of the site for a pedestrian throughway in order to enhance connectivity through this large block. The specified locations for locally higher buildings are influenced by the placemaking benefits of framing public open space, by views from nearby residential properties being filtered by lower buildings, and by the need to maintain the amenities of the public street. All dwellings at ground floor level should have own-door access.

8 - Chadwick's Yard

Existing large warehouse-type structures and industrial yards dominate this site which has potential for complete transformation by way of a new street framework serving perimeter blocks surrounding a new public green. This scheme will complement planned development on the adjoining site at Docklands Innovation Park and have greatly increased permeability.

The scale and massing of development should form an appropriate interface where it adjoins existing residential properties (Merchant’s Road and Merchant’s Square). Opportunities for locally higher buildings exist at the identified locations that can provide urban design benefits, i.e. locations that help frame public open space and at a central node within the site where there would be limited overshadowing impacts. All dwellings at ground floor level should have own-door access. Given the scale of this site, it is appropriate that a masterplan be prepared for the entire area, to address the above matters in addition to planned phasing.

A linear strip of land along the eastern side is reserved for the future South Port Access Route (SPAR) project in accordance with a reservation protected by TII. Hence lands within this reservation are unavailable for any development pending final detailed design of the route. Development proposals adjoining the road reservation shall meet the requirements of TII. Any lands within the reservation that are not needed as part of the eventual design for SPAR should revert to landscaped open space at a later stage and to the satisfaction of TII. This open space should function as an appropriate buffer to the new route. A revision to the above-mentioned masterplan will be allowed at a later stage in response to final design for the SPAR route and to clarify the future use of any remaining lands.

9 - East Road

At the north-eastern and eastern boundaries of the site, development should be orientated and massed to respond to the existing residential buildings on adjoining sites. Development along the southern boundary of the site has less sensitive interfaces and could accommodate a locally higher building. The other locations for locally higher buildings adjoin the public open space at the existing street edge and form a visual marker within the site with views across this space.

The site's public open space provision is positioned at its East Road entrance where it will be visible, inviting and accessible to the public at this arrival point to the East Wall area. All dwellings at ground floor level should have own-door access. Given the scale of this site, it is appropriate that a masterplan be prepared for the entire area, to address the above matters in addition to planned phasing.

10 - Castleforbes Business Park

Redevelopment of this site should incorporate a large public open space at its western end where it will be visible, inviting and accessible to the wider public. Block layout should take into account the existing street and block layout further south including relevant content of the NLGCD Planning Scheme. Locally higher buildings could frame the public open space at a bend in the adjoining perimeter block layout. Two further locations have been identified for enhanced height at the northern end of the site where overshadowing impacts and visual sensitivities are lessened. Given the scale of this site, it is appropriate that a masterplan be prepared for the entire area, to address the above matters in addition to planned phasing.

11 - Trinity College Innovation District

This site located north of the rail line between Macken Street and Grand Canal Quay, has potential to provide a new hub for innovation, bridging between the commercial activities in Docklands and research at Trinity College. This area can accommodate a broad range of uses associated with the primary function of this district, including business, enterprise/research, related residential accommodation, cultural and other supporting/enabling uses. A series of adaptable buildings shall display a variety of quality architecture, and these shall frame a centrally-positioned public square. This square shall have multiple public pedestrian accesses along generously proportioned circulation routes, including a diagonally positioned route connecting to the Macken Street/Pearse Street Junction, and connecting to the quay on the eastern side.

Setbacks on Pearse Street shall accommodate a transformed and widened public realm, and parking provision shall be minimal. The existing historic Tower Building (original sugar mill) should be retained and potentially extended vertically by a maximum of 2-3 storeys, and generous new public space surrounding the building shall enhance its setting, providing an open aspect to Grand Canal Quay. The approach to building height and design shall take account of established residential uses to the west and north, and also proximity to the Alto Vetro building. General site heights to range from 7 to 9 storeys with potential for locally higher buildings at the three selected positions illustrated in the Guiding Principles Map.

There is potential for a landmark building/s within this site having regard to the surrounding context and emerging developments in the area.

Development of this innovation district shall be in accordance with a masterplan to be agreed with Dublin City Council and addressing phasing in addition to the above matters.

12 - ESB Complex, South Lotts Road

Redevelopment of this site should provide for public open space at the western edge of the site, in a location that is visible, inviting and accessible to the public. This open space should be accessible from Margaret Place to the south, and more generally east-west and north-south connectivity though the site should be achieved. Building massing and orientation towards the western and southern sides of the site should respond to the built character of the adjacent residential streets, and this should include townhouse-type design along the western edge (these could be 3-storeys). All dwellings at ground floor level should have own-door access.

Some locally higher buildings could be appropriately located in the north-eastern quadrant of the site. Given the scale of this site, it is appropriate that a masterplan be prepared for the entire area, to address the above matters in addition to planned phasing.

13 - George Reynolds House, Oliver Plunkett Avenue

Any redevelopment of this flat complex should involve a remodelling of the scheme to incorporate:

  1. delivery of perimeter block type layout to enhance communal open spaces, and
  2. new townhouses fronting Oliver Plunket Avenue to reflect the design and grain of the existing dwellings. Public open space would be best located at the Irishtown Road end of the site where it is visible, inviting and accessible to the wider public. All dwellings at ground floor level should have own-door access.
14.       Former Power Station and Pigeon House Hotel, Poolbeg

The former ESB power station and Pigeon House Hotel are both protected structures accessed from Pigeon House Road on the northern side of Poolbeg Peninsula. Both buildings and associated structures are on a seven acre site currently in the ownership of Dublin City Council, and are in need of extensive refurbishment to bring them back into viable use. The site has potential for a landmark building/buildings. The lands are at risk from flooding – see SFRA – Appendix 7. Residential use is not the preferred use for these lands due to particular constraints including adjoining utility uses and the risk from flooding.

DCC has previously sought expressions of interest for the regeneration of these buildings and the associated lands. The Council support development focused on creative, technological and green industries. This has potential to restore activity to these historic buildings in this unique waterfront setting close to the city centre. In this regard, it is the objective of the Council to seek the regeneration of the former power station and Pigeon House Hotel, with associated lands/structures on this site. This will involve extensive refurbishment of these protected structures. Development plan/statutory designations are to be considered from early design stage.

Figure 13-6:     SDRA 6 Docklands

Figure 13.6

 

13.9   SDRA 7 – Heuston and Environs

Introduction

Heuston station is Ireland’s largest multi-modal public transportation hub and anchors the wider SDRA area. The SDRA has the capacity to deliver a significant quantum of development and can become an exemplar of Transport Oriented Development.

The following guiding principles shall apply to this SDRA:

Urban Structure

  • To develop a new urban gateway character area focused on the transport node of Heuston Station with world class public transport interchange facilities; vibrant economic activities; a high-quality destination to live, work and socialise in; a public realm and architectural approach of exceptional high standard; and a gateway to major historic, cultural and recreational attractions of Dublin City.
  • To ensure the application of best practice urban and Transport Orientated Development design principles to achieve:
    • Enhanced infrastructure to encourage active mobility interfacing with the various public transport modes at Heuston.
    • A coherent and legible urban structure within major development sites.
    • A prioritisation on the provision of public space.
    • A successful interconnection between development sites and the adjacent urban structure.
  • To recognise and enhance the role that civic and historic buildings play in the identity and legibility of the Heuston area.
  • To provide greater accessibility to the areas of large public open space as well as creating additional smaller scale parks and civic squares, throughout the SDRA, that are attractive, multi-functional, safe, welcoming and accessible to local residents, workers and visitors.
  • To recognise the acute barriers to connectivity created by a natural features, physical infrastructure and large landbanks of industrial or institutional lands and seek to reduce the impact of these obstacles to movement and connectivity, where appropriate.
  • To seek to provide interventions that contribute a finer grain to the urban structure of the wider area, especially on some of the transport depots of Heuston station and Conyngham Road, if and when they are subject to change over time.
  • The ‘cone of vision’, as set out in the 2003 Heuston Framework Plan, represents a significant panoramic view between, the Royal Hospital Kilmainham and the Phoenix Park extending from the west corner of the north range of the Royal Hospital Kilmainham, and the north-east corner of the Deputy Master’s House to the western side of the Magazine Fort and east edge of the main elevation of the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (former Royal Military Infirmary) respectively. Where there are opportunities for locally higher buildings within this ‘cone’, they must not individually or cumulatively adversely affect this view. A visual impact analysis shall be submitted with planning applications to demonstrate this view is not undermined. This shall also apply to the visual connections from Chesterfield Avenue to Guinness Lands and from the City Quays to the Phoenix Park (Wellington Monument) as indicated on the Framework.

Land Use & Activity

  • To realise the creation of a new mixed-use district focused on sustainable modes of transport through the regeneration of the Heuston lands that incorporates a mix of residential and office uses complemented by culture, retail and service elements.
  • To promote the regeneration and revitalisation of the Kilmainham Mill for civic, cultural, and visitor use.
  • To facilitate connections between the cultural landmarks throughout the area – including the Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Kilmainham Gaol, Kilmainham Mill, National Museum Collins Barracks and the Phoenix Park.
  • To recognise the need for community uses and public spaces to complement the future residential and office development in the Heuston area.

Height

  • To support locally higher buildings of 8-10 storeys as a benchmark height for new developments in the SDRA area where conservation and design considerations permit, including assessment requirements under the Cone of Vision. Opportunities for locally higher buildings with a slender profile and landmark forms above this height, are identified in the accompanying Guiding Principles Map.
  • Opportunities exist for landmark buildings at the Heuston Gateway and at Sean Heuston Bridge on the former Hickeys site in line with the considerations outlined in Appendix 3 of the development plan. The potential locations for landmark buildings are shown on the accompanying Guiding Principles Map.

Design

  • To undertake a public realm study for Kilmainham and Islandbridge villages.
  • To provide for the possibility of public realm and transport interchange improvements to be made to the lands to the front of Heuston Station having regard to its important location as a gateway into the city, its proximity to heavy rail and Luas stops and its placemaking potential on Victoria Quay. Opportunities relating to the Guinness Lands’ role in placemaking and the public realm at this location should also be explored (see SDRA 15).

Green Infrastructure

  • To facilitate the re-imagination of the River Liffey and the Camac River as key amenity and biodiversity corridors.
  • To support the re-naturalisation of the Camac River.
  • To ensure the Military Stream from Phoenix Park to River Liffey is protected and appropriate flood mitigation measures in place to prevent any flood issues.
  • To implement the delivery of greening and biodiversity corridors identified in the Guiding Principles Map that that can also serve as high quality pedestrian and cycle routes and connect public open space provision.
  • To ensure that the public open space provision of development sites be sited at locations that are visible, accessible and inviting to the wider public.
  • To examine the possible consolidation of Croppy's Memorial Park, the Dublin Civil Defence HQ and the Croppy's Acre Memorial Park into a unified park.

Movement

  • To facilitate the delivery of the permeability interventions identified on the Guiding Principles Map which seek to increase accessibility throughout the area and in particular, to the network of walking and cycling infrastructure that is emerging throughout the SDRA.
  • To improve connectivity north-south across the River Liffey and St. John's Road through the Heuston lands to provide for road connectivity between Infirmary Road and Conyngham Road and also east-west between the Heuston lands and the Clancy Quay lands.
  • To improve the pedestrian and cycle connection between Heuston Station and St. James' Hospital campus and to explore the potential of providing increased connectivity between Kilmainham Lane and Mount Brown/Old Kilmainham.
  • To facilitate delivery of cycle routes identified in the NTA GDA Cycle Strategy.
  • To maximise the potential benefit of the BusConnects project to the Heuston area in terms of public realm improvements, green infrastructure and pedestrian and cycling infrastructure.

Guiding Principles for Key Opportunity Sites

1 - Hickeys

Development on this site should provide active frontage to Parkgate Street with active non-residential landuse along this frontage. A riverside walkway should be provided and public access to the river should be allowed at all hours of the day.

Heights should be 6-8 storeys on this site while locally higher buildings  could be located to the rear of the site at the identified locations. The site is suitable for the accommodation of a landmark building in the order of 30 storeys at its eastern end subject to the quality of the design and considerations being in accordance with Appendix 3 of the development plan

2 - Conyngham Road

The bus depot lands offer the opportunity to provide for improved integration with the River Liffey and to deliver a quality urban development. 10% provision of public open space should be provided at the waterfront in the longer term, forming part of an east-west greening and biodiversity corridor along the northern bank of the Liffey. Access to this public open space should remain open to the public at all hours of the day.

A culverted stream transverses this site. In this regard, a site specific flood risk assessment and appropriate flood mitigation measures will be required as part of any future development.

Although the north-south connectivity routes are indicative, road connections as per the overall guiding principles of the SDRA between Conyngham Road and St John’s Road/Military Road could be accommodated in the redevelopment of this regeneration site. Any vehicular bridge to the Heuston lands should be accessed towards the western end of the site. A cycle and pedestrian bridge should line up with the junction with Chesterfield Avenue unless design requirements in the context of the overall site redevelopment indicate a shift eastwards is necessary

Base heights should remain in accordance with prevailing heights along the Conyngham Road frontage where new buildings should respond to the character and grain of the historic buildings on site and the streetscape in which they sit, with the potential for increased height further to the west in accordance with Appendix 3.

The restoration of the vacant and neglected buildings on the south side of Conyngham Road is a matter of priority for the SDRA.

The opportunity for locally higher buildings exists away from the Conyngham Road frontage where buildings of 12-14 storeys could be provided subject to a visual impact analysis having regard to the Cone of Vision and compliance with Appendix 3 of the development plan.

3 - Heuston

Given the scale of the site and its redevelopment potential, it is appropriate that in advance of any development proposal, a masterplan be prepared and agreed, taking into consideration the wider area, and planned phasing.

Redevelopment of the site should provide for east-west and north-south connections in the manner identified in the Guiding Principles Map and also link up any potential future transport hubs to the adjoining areas beyond the Heuston lands. Vehicular access to the site is to provide local access only, save for the connection to Conyngham Road indicated above.

Wider pedestrian and cycle connections linking the Phoenix Park to the Royal Hospital of Kilmainham lands both via Military Road to Chesterfield Avenue and also in the western alignment shown in the Guiding Principles Map should be explored and accommodated as part of the masterplan response.

A greening and open space masterplan should also be provided identifying a network of public open spaces including civic squares and parks, throughout the Heuston lands, that are attractive, multi-functional, safe, welcoming and accessible to the wider public.

No less than 10% of the site area is to be provided as public open space and should connect in with a riverside greening and biodiversity corridor.

On these lands, where heritage considerations allow, including structures on the NIAH and DCIHR, and having regard to the Cone of Vision, it is considered that prevailing heights pursued should be 8-10 storeys. Locally higher buildings at certain locations in the Regeneration Site could be accommodated with a landmark building over and above these heights located at the identified point. The locations for such height should be developed through the masterplan process and in accordance with the principles set out in the SDRA and Appendix 3 of the development plan and having regard to the conservation objectives of the Cone of Vision.

A community/cultural facility of significance should be incorporated into any redevelopment of the lands.

4 - Heuston South Quarter

Development on this site should be around a central area of communal open space integrating the needs of the residents of the first phases of the Heuston South Quarter development.

Building heights should respond to the 'Cone of Vision' identified in the Guiding Principles Map.

5 - St. James’ St./Bow Lane West

Redevelopment of this site should provide activation to the linear walkway leading from St. James' St. to Bow Lane West through the provision of windows and doors opening towards the laneway, as well as balconies providing passive surveillance of the walkway below.
 

Figure 13-7:     SDRA 7 Heuston and Environs

Figure 13.7

Heuston Station

13.10 SDRA 8 – Grangegorman/Broadstone

Introduction

In April 2002, the Government made the decision that a new consolidated TU Dublin campus would be developed at Grangegorman, complemented with new healthcare facilities, and integrated into the city fabric. A Planning Scheme for Grangegorman was approved by An Bord Pleanála in July 2012 as a Strategic Development Zone.

This significant re-development project (c. 30 hectares) is managed by the Grangegorman Development Agency, whose role it is to deliver a modern campus for Technology University Dublin (TU Dublin), to provide the Health Service Executive with upgraded primary health and social care facilities and to provide other facilities including a new school and sports grounds for the benefit of the community. Overall objectives for creating connections, urban form, campus nodes, landscaping etc. are set out in detail in the SDZ Planning Scheme.

Implementation of the SDZ is on-going. The first public element delivered was the Phoenix Care Centre which was officially opened in February 2013 and provides a replacement mental health facility for St. Brendan’s Hospital, on the North Circular Road. Key large-scale site infrastructure and public realm works have also been carried out, and the TU Dublin campus opened its doors to the first 1,000 students in September 2014.

The construction of a c. 4,414 m2 Greenway Hub building, a c.16,000m2 East Quad and a c.33,000m2 Central Quad is now complete, accommodating academic activities and facilities required for the Environmental Health Sciences Institute and business incubation space, the College of Arts & Tourism, College of Sciences & Health and College of Engineering and Built Environment. It is anticipated that the TU Dublin developments will provide capacity for a student population of c.15,000 by 2024.

Other key elements delivered include all-weather GAA, rugby and soccer pitches along with a new playground for local children, a new link from Broadstone Plaza and the first phase of a new site energy centre. A further project delivered in the short term is the HSE new primary care centre (located in the Old Laundry Building).

The Lower House, formerly the Richmond Lunatic Asylum is now open to c. 4,335m2 of development that includes music practice rooms, student union offices, a restaurant and coffee shop, some sport and recreation activities (exercise studios, dance studio) and general student support services.

By 2023, c.100 bed Residential Care Neighbourhood for the elderly and those with a mental health support needs will be delivered. Within this timeframe, it is also anticipated that a new 24 Classroom Educate Together National School will be in service, replacing a current temporary facility.

When complete, the SDZ will comprise c.380,000 sq. m. of repurposed and new buildings. Ultimately, the TU Dublin population on site will amount to c.25,000 people, comprising c.20,000 full time students, c.2,500 part time students and c.2,500 staff.

The guiding principles for this area are captured by the overall vision for Grangegorman set out in the SDZ Planning Scheme and are as follows:

  • The Planning Scheme will create a vibrant, high-quality and legible urban quarter, with a clear sense of place.
  • Deliver the requirements of the HSE, Department of Education and TU Dublin in an integrated fashion.
  • Respect and celebrate the heritage of Grangegorman.
  • Reach out to and embrace the existing local community and the future students, service users and staff of Grangegorman.
  • Sustainability is a core requirement and the quarter must be both responsive to its current context and development needs, and adaptable to its future context and development needs.
  • The quarter will be a centre for innovation and creativity.
  • Contribute to the regeneration of the inner city.
  • Provide a dynamic new economic engine for the city and region.

The continued implementation of the Grangegorman SDZ is expected and encouraged throughout the life of the development plan. The Guiding Principles Map as set out in Figure 13.8 is for high level illustrative purposes only. All future development should be in accordance with the Grangegorman SDZ Planning Scheme

Broadstone is currently a transport hub catering for Dublin Bus maintenance requirements and also maintenance for future vehicle specifications, such as battery electric vehicles and hydrogen vehicles if required. Whilst there is no proposed re-development of this site at present, it is recognised that these lands have significant potential if some or all of the existing use were to relocate. Where re-development proposals are considered for the site, a Masterplan shall be prepared having regards to the constraints, strengths and opportunities of the site. Any such masterplan must be sensitive to the significant built heritage of the lands and the historic urban context surrounding the lands. In this context, there is potential for 2/3 locally higher buildings. Development should seek to deliver sensitively designed and sited compact growth with appropriate range of community and recreational spaces.

 

Figure 13-8:     SDRA 8 Grangegorman/Broadstone

Figure 13.8

 

Grangegorman

13.11 SDRA 9 – Emmet Road

Introduction

The SDRA builds on the Kilmainham-Inchicore Development Strategy and identifies a number of industrial/former industrial sites, Dublin City Council housing sites and other potential regeneration sites that offer strategic regeneration opportunities for the area.

Leveraging key pieces of public infrastructure such as the Grand Canal cycleway and the Luas Red Line, the SDRA seeks to provide a strategic vision for the redevelopment of these regeneration sites and to improve their connections to the villages of Inchicore and Kilmainham.

The guiding principles for the development of this SDRA as set out below:

Urban Structure

  • To recognise the natural and constructed features such as rivers, canals and rail lines that have strongly influenced the urban structure of the area, as well as its morphology over the last century.
  • To encourage development that reinforces the village cores of Inchicore and Kilmainham, connected by Emmet Road, as the central spine of the area.
  • To seek to provide interventions that contribute a finer grain to the urban structure of the wider area, especially on former industrial and institutional lands.
  • To recognise and enhance the role that cultural and historic buildings play in the identity and legibility of the wider area.

Land Use & Activity

  • To encourage the transition from industrial or former industrial use to mixed-use/residential use in the four 'potential development sites' identified in the Guiding Principles Map whilst acknowledging the role many of the uses play in the local economy and community.
  • To deliver a new civic and community hub as part of the redevelopment of the Emmet Road Regeneration Site.
  • To facilitate the reconfiguration/consolidation of educational uses in the Emmet Crescent area.
  • To capitalise on the presence of Richmond Barracks and Goldenbridge Cemetery within the Inchicore area and to facilitate the creation of linkages to other nearby historic and cultural uses.

Height

  • To support heights of 6-8 storeys for new developments in the SDRA area where conservation and design considerations permit. Opportunities for locally higher buildings above this height are identified in the accompanying Guiding Principles Map.

Design

  • To ensure that new buildings respond to the scale and grain of the prevailing character of the particular street.
  • To undertake public realm studies for both Kilmainham and Inchicore villages.
  • To create a civic plaza at the Emmet Road end of the redeveloped Emmet Road Regeneration Site.
  • New apartment buildings to generally have own-door access for all dwellings at ground floor level to contribute to increased vitality and activation of the area.

Green Infrastructure

  • To promote the undertaking of a Greening Strategy for the wider Kilmainham-Inchicore area.
  • To support the re-naturalisation of the Camac River in association with the Camac Flood Alleviation Scheme.
  • To better integrate the Grand Canal with the wider Kilmainham-Inchicore area.
  • To create a linked network of greening corridors including walkways, biodiversity corridors, cycleways and parks, as identified in the Guiding Principles Map. These should be attractive, welcoming and accessible, feed into a wider network and connect up to the local schools in the area.
  • To ensure that the public open space provision of development sites be sited at locations that are visible, accessible and inviting to the wider public.

Movement

  • To facilitate delivery of cycle routes identified in the NTA GDA Cycle Strategy.
  • To facilitate the delivery of the permeability interventions identified in the Guiding Principles Map, which seek to improve accessibility throughout the area.
  • To improve connectivity north-south across the Grand Canal/Davitt Road and east-west between Goldenbridge Industrial Estate and the Emmet Road Regeneration Site.
  • To encourage development that enhances the vitality of the emerging network of walking and cycling infrastructure.
  • To seek the delivery of a new bridge crossing the Grand Canal through any redevelopment of Development Sites 1 and 2 as indicated in the Guiding Principles Map.
  • To maximise the potential benefit of the BusConnects project to the SDRA area in terms of public realm improvements, green infrastructure and pedestrian and cycling infrastructure.

Guiding Principles for Key Opportunity Sites

1 - Goldenbridge Industrial Estate

The redevelopment of this site presents the opportunity to create east-west connections via Mercy College Secondary School and north-south with the opening up of the southern boundary of the site. Buildings should provide active and animated edges to the canal and also to the identified connections.

The Camac River is culverted for the majority of its journey through the site. The potential for its renaturalisation should be investigated further via a masterplan process in tandem with the River Camac Restoration Project. Refer to Policy SI11 and SI12 for further details.

2 - Davitt Road West

This site provides significant opportunity for residential led development. The majority of this sites allocation of public open space should be located at the Davitt Road frontage, opposite Goldenbridge Industrial Estate, where it is visible, inviting and accessible to the wider public. Locally higher buildings framing it should provide appropriate levels of enclosure without undue overshadowing.

Connections through the site should be created to link the public open space to the neighbourhood centre on Galtymore Road while connections should be made to the north via a new bridge across the Grand Canal.

Buildings running along the southern and eastern boundary should  be appropriately scaled and massed to respond to their residential interface with the properties fronting onto Carrow Road and Galtymore Road.

Should the HSE site and lands immediately to the north of same on the western end of the site become available for development, it should align with the proposals set out for the rest of the site.

3 - Emmet Road Regeneration Site

This site is located at the heart of the SDRA area. It is proposed to be redeveloped as a mixed use scheme which, as well as being Dublin City Council's first cost rental residential development, will accommodate a mix of community uses, including a new community centre and library.

Commercial units, including a supermarket should be located at the northern end of the site, fronting onto a civic plaza along Emmet Road. The site's redevelopment will serve to tie together the wider SDRA area.

In relation to heights, the Emmet Road site is considered capable of delivering a new baseline height of 8 storeys with locally higher buildings in specified locations as detailed in the Guiding Principles Map, Figure 13-9, subject to detailed design and to compliance with Appendix 3 of the development plan.

In relation to unit mix and typologies and having regard to the cost rental nature of the scheme and the particular profile of housing provision in the area, the standards set out in Section 15.9.1 of the Plan are not necessarily applicable to the Emmet Road project.

Any redevelopment of Tyrone Place should seek to integrate with the wider redevelopment of the Emmet Road Regeneration Site. In particular, along its eastern boundary building heights should address the emerging heights on the opposite side of the St. Vincent St. West. Along the northern boundary, the built form should respond to the prevailing heights and grain of buildings on the opposite side of Thomas Davis St. West and contribute to the creation of a more cohesive character to the street.

4 - Davitt Road East

While this site appears to be in a number of different ownership parcels, any redevelopment of the sites should follow the pattern identified in the Guiding Principles Map, with buildings appropriately spaced. A number of locally higher buildings located along the Davitt Road edge could deliver urban design benefits. Due to the fragmented ownership, the public open space provision could be provided via a contribution in-lieu, to be used for the upgrading of nearby areas of public open space such as at Devoy Road or the unused space on the canal end of Goldenbridge Terrace.

 

Figure 13-9:     SDRA 9 Emmet Road

SDRA Map 9

 

13.12 SDRA 10 – North East Inner City

Introduction

The NEIC SDRA has an area of 161ha and is located in the city centre just north of the River Liffey, extending from the historic Moore Street area, on its western side, to Docklands, on the east. It includes areas to the east of Dorset Street and extends to some areas north of the Royal Canal. Given the significance of this area and its regeneration potential, Dublin City Council is committed to preparing a Local Area Plan for this SDRA during the lifetime of this development plan, and, therefore, this SDRA forms an interim strategy and sets guiding principles for the LAP.

The NEIC is rich in heritage with a number of significant cultural and historical attractions including Abbey Theatre and Parnell Square. The area has excellent public transport connectivity due to its proximity to the city centre, and will also benefit from the proposed Metrolink and ongoing development of the Royal Canal Greenway. The area clearly has many location advantages and is home to long established business and a diverse residential community. It is however, an area with a history of socio-economic deprivation and is identified as being in need of both social and economic regeneration.

The area is undergoing transformation with a number of initiatives being implemented on foot of the Mulvey report titled “Creating a Brighter Future”. The area has also recently received funding for a number of projects under the Urban and Regional Development Fund (URDF) including public realm works at Parnell Square, Moore Street, the Five Lamps and also restoration works at Moore Street and Mountjoy Square.

There is now an opportunity to focus further on realising the potential of the area, to complement the above initiatives and promote quality development on underutilised sites, alongside planned public realm improvements. This can be done in a way which recognises the unique characteristics and needs of this area. The main focus will be on the regeneration of identified key sites in accordance with site briefs. Key objectives are:

  1. To provide a spatial framework for land uses including much-needed housing.
  2. To restore a coherent urban structure where it is poor or fragmented and improving the public realm.
  3. To support community development through targeted objectives on selected sites.
  4. To plan for improved connectivity and public amenity while utilising existing assets in the area.

The area is unique in having the benefit of varied assets including:

  • O’Connell Street, the capital’s main thoroughfare, with the GPO (including museum); the core retail areas of Henry Street and North Earl street along with a range of retail services, food and beverage offer.
  • A range of heritage and cultural assets including the Hugh Lane, the Writers Museum, the LAB and Dancehouse.
  • Moore Street to the west of the SDRA, famed for its on-street trading and linked to significant historic events of 1916.
  • Parnell Square and Mountjoy Square, both Georgian era planned squares.
  • Proximity to Croke Park, which fronts the Royal Canal, an emerging strategic greenway.
  • Many historically important sites that contribute towards the area’s character some of which also have significant future potential.

In conjunction with other development plan objectives, targeted objectives for the NEIC can make a positive contribution towards placemaking and future physical and social regeneration, whilst simultaneously fostering the growth of established inner city residential neighbourhoods and communities.

The following guiding principles apply to the NEIC SDRA:

Urban Structure

  • To reinforce the existing pedestrian spines identified in the Guiding Principles Map and to capitalise on these through targeted permeability interventions, increasing connectivity and stimulating pedestrian journeys throughout the area.
  • To recognise the amenity and placemaking potential that exists within the Royal Canal corridor and associated development sites and to undertake an urban design study looking at how to unlock this potential.
  • To develop four civic hubs as focal points of local activity, including one with a strong community focus, centred on Sean McDermott Street around the former Convent and Laundry site and the Sean McDermott St. Leisure Centre/Our Lady of Lourdes Church site (see also below).
  • To recognise the importance of the architectural and cultural heritage of the area including existing and proposed Architectural Conservation Areas centred on O’Connell Street, North Great Georges Street, Moore Street and Mountjoy Square.
  • To create a hierarchy of public open spaces including civic squares and parks, throughout the NEIC that are attractive, multi-functional, and accessible to local residents, workers and visitors. Associated with this will be an enhancement of existing open spaces. This approach will help to address the existing deficit in public open space within the SDRA.
  • The necessary regeneration of some social housing blocks will provide an opportunity to improve the human scale of the existing urban structure. Redevelopment of these blocks should integrate an urban grain that recognises historic plot sizes of the location.
  • To encourage mews development in the locations identified in the Guiding Principles Map. This will provide greater activation along these lanes and facilitate greater use by pedestrians. Appropriate public lighting should be targeted at these locations.

Land Use & Activity

Overview

The area is centrally located and contains a range of diverse uses including residential, employment, and mixed use areas. It also accommodates a core retail area, many specialist services, cultural/arts uses and various institutions. Some areas have been zoned Z14 in recognition of the strategic regeneration potential of the area and to encourage an appropriate integration of new development into the urban fabric. A key objective of the SDRA is to ensure the sustainable consolidation of the NEIC working with existing assets, and integrating the full potential of a range of sites. An indicative framework addresses these sites graphically, with associated text set out to guide their future development. Some of these sites can work either individually or together for quite specific purposes, and these have been identified as ‘hubs’/ ‘opportunity sites’ below. There are four of these as follows:

O’Connell Street/Moore Street Civic/Cultural Hub –In recognition of the historic built form and history of the area and the potential for public interaction given its key location in the north retail core. With proximity to the emerging cultural quarter around Parnell Square, and its associated range of arts and literary attractions, this hub would act as a natural extension to the existing cultural quarter extending its reach, blending with a new mix of uses. With excellent transport access, this precinct will become even more accessible to the wider public when planned public transport improvements are delivered over time. The Moore Street market will become a re-energised market street, with a significantly improved public realm and act as a gateway, and through route, to the historical assets of the area, to create synergies to benefit the entire city block, breathing new life to the area. (*The historical assets are not limited to Moore Street/Moore Lane, but include O’Connell Street & the GPO)

Sean Mac Dermott Street Civic/Community Hub –Centred around existing and future community/ social facilities for the surrounding residential communities. It supports revitalisation of these services based on a new built layout in accordance with the framework. An associated upgraded public realm would comprise a new civic space and thus a focal point for the local community.

Five Lamps Civic Hub- Centred around a mix of established housing complexes and protected structures with part frontage to the Royal Canal at the well-known local, city and national landmark, the Five Lamps, a five armed road junction. The framework layout will restore an attractive built layout and provide for appropriate infill with suitably reconfigured open space, and enhanced permeability. Aldborough House can become a focal point for the local community.

City Gateway Civic Hub – Immediately adjoining the SDRA for the Docklands and serves as an entry point to the inner city and also an access to the employment lands of the Docklands SDRA. It’s positioning on the River Tolka at Annesley Bridge, overlooking Fairview Park, gives the hub capacity for large scale developments. Its regeneration will work in tandem with an identified regeneration site 6 within the Docklands SDRA, where a planned landmark building will provide a clear visual marker.

Housing
  • To promote an increased residential population and the successful integration of new and established residents and communities.
  • To ensure that new residential developments accord with the indicative layout illustrated in the framework, supporting social, community and amenity infrastructure/services in the local area.
  • To promote a variety of house types and tenures, avoiding an over-concentration of specialist accommodation such as tourist and student accommodation, thereby, ensuring capacity for the growth of balanced residential communities.
  • To promote the development of high quality residential mews dwellings at appropriate locations and in accordance with relevant standards, thereby, unlocking the residential potential of laneways, improving public realm, and increasing pedestrian permeability where possible.
Social and Community Infrastructure
  • To support the development of the URDF funded Community Centre which includes an exhibition space, at the disused former school premises at Rutland Street, and any future URDF funded projects within the area.
  • Further to the Mulvey Report recommendations, to support, (a) the diversification of the sports facilities available in the area (in conjunction with DCC’s Sport and Wellbeing Partnership), including the provision of new outdoor playing space, (b) the development of facilities that encourage participation in the arts.
  • To investigate the potential of an existing underperforming site adjacent to the Belvedere Youth Club on Buckingham Street Lower (as identified in the Mulvey Report) for expansion of existing services, subject to future feasibility studies.
Education and Employment
  • To encourage local employment, where the appropriate skills are available, on construction projects in the area.
  • To support the use of educational buildings within the area for evening and weekend use in the provision of education related services and recreational use.
  • In association with relevant agencies, to encourage the development of Social Enterprise in the area by promoting the development of new enterprise space / starter units in appropriate locations.
  • To support the development of a heritage/tourist/ literary trail (as identified in the Mulvey Report) in association with relevant agencies such as Tourism Ireland, Waterways Ireland, the NTA , and in consultation with key stakeholders .
Open Space and Recreation
  • The provision of public open space on development sites should, where possible, be at locations that are visible, accessible and inviting to the wider public.
  • To examine the possibility for the open space at St. Francis Xavier Church to become available for public patronage.
  • To promote the regeneration of Mountjoy Square to improve its amenity potential.
  • To carry out an audit of recreation and sporting facilities within the SDRA area to help identify areas of potential deficit.
  • To seek appropriate public realm improvements in the prime retail core area, to include enhanced open spaces and provision of public seating.

Height

Extending from the historic retail core, through Georgian squares and connecting with the edge of Docklands, the NEIC is diverse in terms of built fabric and character. This variety of built form reflects both the diversity of uses in buildings and also the various architectural eras during which these buildings and public spaces were built. This context, as referenced in various planning designations, is important in determining appropriate building heights, yet there is considerable scope for variety in height across the area.

A range of sites within the SDRA are suited to regeneration and some of these are either sufficiently large or suitably located to define their own character. These can generally absorb some additional height. Height guidance is provided here for selected key development sites, informed by urban design principles responsive to context, and with appropriate locations for enhanced height identified within each site (see Guiding Principles Map). These taller elements, in addition to facilitating increased density, provide a basis for varied architectural expression and in some cases, have the potential to punctuate the established local heights whilst avoiding significant negative impacts (see Appendix 3). This additional height should be expressed vertically, and where forming part only of a larger building, should not extend horizontally along the block such that its visual prominence is flattened.

All new development of significant height and density over the prevailing context must accord with the specific performance criteria as set out in Appendix 3 of this development plan.

Design

The NEIC area is diverse in regard to built form, the varied design reflecting a diversity of land uses appropriate to this central location. The area also includes some vacant sites, underutilised or infill sites, and some sites of significant heritage value. This context affords considerable scope for significant regeneration, and the following shall apply in relation to buildings/complexes, and spaces:

  • New buildings/schemes in the area shall necessarily have regard to the framework guidance set out. This is especially relevant to specific strategic sites in relation to building heights, building lines, public spaces and other specified parameters. A masterplan requirement will apply for some larger strategic sites.
  • A high-quality public realm will be required and shall be applied to the network of streets and public spaces, with a focus on maximising public open space provision, improving connectivity/permeability and encouraging greening initiatives.
  • High-quality architectural design and building materials will be encouraged throughout the SDRA. Architectural variety shall be encouraged, and contextual urban grain shall be considered, particularly for infill development. Flexibility will be applied in relation to design style provided there is appropriate regard to built context and relevant policy.

Green Infrastructure

  • To support the implementation of the projects identified in the North East Inner City Greening Strategy and seek to address the deficit of public open space it identifies. For other areas within the SDRA, to promote greening initiatives and the upgrading of existing open spaces.
  • To implement the delivery of greening corridors identified in the Guiding Principles Map that that can also serve as high quality pedestrian and cycle routes and connect existing and planned public open spaces.
  • To facilitate the reimagining of the Royal Canal as a key public amenity and biodiversity corridor.
  • To create a new public garden as part of the regeneration of the convent buildings on Sean McDermott St. and as a central amenity within this planned hub.
  • To investigate the removal of car parking spaces in front of the Rotunda Hospital building on Parnell Street, and the conversion of this area to a high quality publicly accessible open space appropriate to its unique setting.

Movement & Transport

  • To strengthen the existing core pedestrian spine of the area as both the key movement corridor and also the location of existing and emerging public transport hubs, and to specifically target interventions such as densification and street upgrades towards streets with low footfall and regeneration potential.
  • To deliver public realm improvements at Five Lamps/Charleville Mall, Moore St. Quarter, Parnell Square and also at the proposed Sean McDermott Street civic/community hub.
  • To encourage development that provides interaction and vitality of permeability interventions identified in the Guiding Principles Map. Own door access to ground floor units to be provided along all routes as well as balconies at upper floor levels. All of these new/improved routes are required to be publicly accessible at all hours of the day, unless significant reasons require the contrary.
  • To facilitate delivery of cycle routes identified in the NTA GDA Cycle Strategy.
  • To work with the Bus Connects project in the NEIC area to help maximise improvements in public realm, green infrastructure and pedestrian and cycling infrastructure.

Guiding Principles for Key Opportunity Sites

O’Connell Street/Moore Street Civic/Cultural Hub

1 – O’Connell Street to Moore Lane incorporating Carlton Site

This 2.2 ha site incorporates buildings extending from O’Connell Street, Ireland’s premier street, to Moore Street, including Moore Lane, O’ Rahilly Parade, Henry Street North and Henry Place. It is identified within the Guiding Principles Map as a civic/cultural hub because of both its historical/cultural importance and because of its potential as a focus for quality retail and mixed-use development. The site is of significant historical importance given its association with the 1916 Easter Rising, and Moore Street is also well known for its open-air fruit and vegetable market. The area has the potential to be transformed through heritage-led, mixed-use regeneration that acknowledges and responds creatively to the cultural roles and historical significance of this centrally located site.

Scheme design should be based on a comprehensive masterplan that incorporates a convenient access route to the planned Metrolink stop, quality connections across the site, and a cultural interpretative element. Any final proposal must incorporate at least one new east-west pedestrian route interlinking to at least two new civic spaces within the block, utilising the existing lane structure for cross connections.

Masterplan proposals should hence incorporate the following:

  • New pedestrian connections linking both O’Connell St. to Moore St. via a new public square, and also Henry Street to Henry Place/Moore Lane.
  • Exceptional architectural design to match the importance of this city block that will effectively interlink the historic GPO with the emerging cultural quarter at Parnell Square.
  • A new civic square, open to the public, and quality pedestrian access to the proposed Metrolink station.
  • An appropriate mix of uses to ensure activity both day and night. Active ground floors should front public routes.
  • The restoration of a significant element of the Upper O’Connell Street streetscape, including the former Carlton Cinema façade, No 42 O’Connell Street, and Conway’s Pub on Parnell Street.
  • Heritage –led retention and restoration of all pre-1916 buildings and fabric along Moore Street.
  • Acknowledge the urban architectural and historical context and complement the scale and design of the National Monument at Nos. 14 -17 Moore Street and its reuse as a commemorative visitor centre (URDF Government funding relates).
  • Moore Street Public Realm Renewal works to include lighting, public art, paving, stalls, signage (URDF Government funding relates).
  • Promote a high quality street market that firstly offers a diverse food range, speciality food with outdoor seating serving same that knits with the proposed Public Realm Renewal works proposed for the area and secondly a high quality urban environment that promotes a mix of uses, including residential at upper levels to ensure passive supervision and continual activity.
  • A detailed phasing plan to address different stages of construction, co-ordinated as necessary with other planned works that may take place during the planned construction period.

Proposals for this area must also have regard to:

  • The policies and provisions of the O’Connell Street Architectural Conservation Area (ACA ), 2001, and the Scheme of Special Planning Control for O’Connell Street & Environs 2016, including any amendments thereto, along with those of the proposed Draft Moore Street Architectural Conservation Area or similar where adopted.
  • Protected Structures (as provided on the City Council’s Record of Protected Structures (RPS)) and the policies and objectives of this development plan for such structures, together with the provisions of the Architectural Heritage Protection Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2011).
  • Ministerial Recommendations for the proposed addition of buildings and other structures to the City Council’s RPS, provided under Section 53 of the Planning and Development Act, 2000 (as amended), together with the relevant policies and objectives for same in this development plan.
  • The content of the Moore Street Advisory Group’s 2021 report to the Minister.
2 - Lands to west of existing Hotel off Jones Road

This parcel of land fronts the Royal Canal and includes no buildings but provides temporary car parking to the west of the existing Hotel off Jones Road. The site presents an opportunity for well integrated development benefitting from views over the Royal Canal.

Any future redevelopment of this site shall investigate access from both Drumcondra Park to the west and Jones Road to the east, and should maximise pedestrian access options. The indicative building line should follow a courtyard layout with a linear southern elevation overlooking the Royal Canal, ensuring a degree of passive supervision. A central communal open space should be provided. Building height to the south of Russell Avenue shall take into consideration impacts on the residential amenities of the existing two storey housing. Amplified height can be accommodated on the southeastern corner of the block where impacts on amenities would be least, this element providing visual variety as seen from the Royal Canal.

3 - Russell St/North Circular Road

These lands have significant regeneration potential and are well located along both the Royal Canal corridor and the North Circular Road. Regeneration of the site should seek to retain and integrate existing buildings of heritage. Any redevelopment should provide built edges to its three street frontages, while a setback should be provided along its northern boundary to create a more generous interface with the Royal Canal. Permeability through the site should connect up its four bounding edges and public access should be maintained at all hours of the day. A masterplan will be required in relation to proposals on this site, addressing stated requirements and setting out planned phasing.

Amplified height has been identified in the Guiding Principles Map. The south-east corner can absorb a locally higher buildings due to its visual prominence and location at a key juncture while at the other locations, the enhanced height should be designed so as to be less visible from neighbouring streets. Built form along the Russell St. and Portland St. North edges should respond to the existing built form character of the dwellings opposite with respect to scale and grain.

4 - Croke Park lands to the south of Croke Park Stadium

These lands currently facilitate entry to southern Croke Park stands, with a crossing over the Royal Canal and railway line and an associated car-park sandwiched between existing housing to the west along Russell Street and O’Connell School to the east.

There is potential for regeneration of this underutilised site, which has clear benefits of being both secluded and also positioned on the Royal Canal Greenway. Redevelopment is largely dependent however, on the removal/relocation or undergrounding of the existing carpark, which is encouraged. Were this achieved, there is an opportunity to develop a substantial development. There can be flexibility regarding the block layout provided the design incorporates:

  • A direct pedestrian connection from the scheme to the Canal Greenway and enhanced public realm in this area.
  • Connectivity to the southern side, linking the scheme to both Wellesley Place, and St. Margaret Avenue/St Joseph’s Terrace.
5 - Fitzgibbon Street Flats

Any redevelopment of this existing flat complex should seek to restore the building line along road frontages to both Fitzgibbon St. and North Circular Road. A strong edge should also be presented to Fitzgibbon Lane (to rear of properties on Belvedere Place), which in tandem with development of mews units as illustrated in the framework graphic, will help to activate and enliven the laneway. Own door access to ground floor units to be provided at all three frontages.

6 - Charles St. Great

The redevelopment of this vacant site, in tandem with development of mews units on the opposite side of Charles Lane, will help to activate and enliven this lane which interconnects Fitzgibbon Street and Charles Street Great. Redevelopment of the site should provide a strong built edge along all three street frontages with own door access to all ground floor units. The Tyrell Place frontage should comprise townhouses or duplexes responding to the fine grain Victorian terraced housing opposite, and appropriately integrated into the remaining development.

7 - Matt Talbot Court

Any redevelopment of this flat complex should seek to restore the building line along frontages to Charles St. Great, Sean O'Casey Avenue and Summer Place, with own door access to all ground floor units. Development at Sean O'Casey Avenue should respond to the scale and grain of the existing terraced buildings on the street. A north-south pedestrian street through the site should be provided for, lining up with Charles Lane to the north. This approach ensures an improved integration of the site with its built surroundings.

8 - Bus Depot, Summerhill

This site has strategic regeneration potential due to its scale and setting and because new through routes can improve connectivity to existing housing. Should it be redeveloped, two north-south connections should be provided through the site. The first along its eastern boundary with a second connecting Mountjoy Place to Summerhill via a linear public park. This second route could form part of a wider cycle network. An east-west connection should be provided for at the north of the site, extending Gardiner Lane to meet Summer Place. Limited increased height on either side of this park provides an opportunity for architectural variety in the scheme, with associated urban design benefits.

Sean McDermott Street Civic/Community Hub

The designation of this hub is to provide a renewed focus for the local community based around publicly accessible uses in an appropriately designed setting. It builds on some established uses and buildings, and works with the potential of underutilised sites to create a fresh identity and improved urban integration. The role of sites 9, 10 and 11 are set out below in regard to how this could be achieved.

9. Lands on the Northern side of Sean McDermott Street

This site has strategic regeneration potential and should form the focal point to a new civic/community hub focused on Sean McDermott Street, incorporating varied community uses, a civic plaza, and improved permeability. Current uses include a public swimming pool and Our Lady of Lourdes Church. Should the site be redeveloped, it should provide two north-south connections through the site, allowing for the development of three separate blocks, the central one forming a perimeter block. Development parallel to the western boundary should respond to the scale and amenity of the properties to the west.

The two new connections should run through substantial linear green spaces between the blocks. An east-west connection should also be provided for at the north of the site, connecting Gloucester Place Upper to Rutland Street Lower, and enhancing permeability for the wider area. Given the prominence of this site and established community uses, the quantum of civic/community uses on the site should not be reduced as a result of any redevelopment. A civic plaza should be created providing a new focal point to the wider Sean McDermott St. area and be fronted by active, non-residential uses at ground floor level. This should be designed so as to engage with the future use of Site 10 opposite.

10 - Convent Lands, Sean McDermott St.

As a former Magdalene Laundry, it is a site of great historic importance. Its regeneration and refurbishment should marry the conservation and cultural heritage qualities of the lands with the opportunity to provide activation and renewal of the Railway Street interface, thereby, enhancing public realm. As an integral part of this work, the provision of an appropriate memorial will be investigated with key agencies and stakeholders. An internal garden/courtyard befitting a site of its cultural significance should be designed to be accessible and inviting to the public. Also, two north-south connections through the site should be provided at the locations indicated on the Guiding Principles Map, to tie into the more strategic connections through the area. These should provide throughways that are visible and legible on approach, the routes designed with sufficient width to avoid creation of narrow alleyways. See also CUO9, Chapter 12.

11 - Railway Street

An infill site that should provide a built edge along its western and northern frontages. This will frame a side of the planned pedestrian route extending north-south through multiple sites. Own door access should be provided at ground floor level on both frontages.

Five Lamps Civic Hub

The illustrated five lamps civic hub incorporates assets such as the Royal Canal, nearby Charleville Mall library, and historic Aldborough House, and takes in three regeneration sites numbered 12-14 inclusive hereunder. The illustrated framework, through the provision of improved pedestrian connectivity, restored building lines, and a pocket park, provides an opportunity to build on these assets, redefining the area’s identity.

12 - Aldborough House

Aldborough House, a Georgian era protected structure, is located at a visually prominent position near the five lamps junction. Despite the building being in poor condition at present, it nevertheless has potential to become a focal point for the area given its historic character and visual presence. This is dependent on it  being restored back into viable use either with or without new development on the site. Any future proposal must recognise the historic merits of the site and carefully consider the setting and conservation of the building and associated structures.

13 - Backlands and Health Centre site at Portland Row/North Strand Road.

This site is one of three interconnected sites and includes some underutilised backlands north of Portland Road, and also a HSE Health Centre at North Strand Road.

The regeneration of this underused site has potential to sensitively develop backlands, restore building lines and improve connectivity through the wider block. The indicative site layout effectively provides for optimal use of former depot lands, with townhouses recommended adjacent to some existing housing, and a new centrally positioned block unlocking an area of backlands.

Any redevelopment of the Health Centre element of the site creates potential for a new building that provides a stronger building line and corner to the street at North Strand Road, and demolition of the City Council block of flats just north of the Health Centre (along with rehousing of the residents) can help provide space for a new public square of open space, helping reduce the current shortfall of open space in the area. A new street interconnecting Portland Row through to North Great Clarence Street could then provide an alternative connection to the busy North Strand Road.

14 - Clarence/Dunne Street Flat complexes

This existing Dublin City Council flat complex, comprising three detached blocks in a staggered layout, is of a poorly integrated layout and provides an opportunity through any future redevelopment, to create new building lines enclosing a new public through route, which would connect well to adjoining regeneration sites and also provide direct routes to the main thoroughfares.

An improved street design, with parallel linear building lines, has potential to provide passive supervision of the new public realm. New blocks should be designed to protect the residential amenities of nearby pre-existing housing, and the new street should be tree-lined.

15 – Lands off Richmond Street South, south of the Royal Canal

Accessed from Richmond Street North, off the North Circular Road, these are largely underutilised or undeveloped lands at a location that fronts the Royal Canal, close to Croke Park to the north. Regeneration of this site has potential to provide improved permeability for the wider area, and to also ensure a degree of overlooking of the Royal Canal amenity route.

Any proposed layout should demonstrate the permeability connections illustrated in the framework. In this regard, a direct publicly-accessible connection should be provided from North Richmond Street through to the Canal, and there should also be a link from the site directly to Richmond Parade to the east. New built frontage to the Royal Canal should provide passive supervision for users of the canal hence enhancing public realm for both residents and canal users. Amenities of existing residential development around the site, including at Richmond Parade, should be carefully considered in regard to scheme layout and design/scale.

16 - North Strand/Poplar Row

These underutilised lands have significant regeneration potential. When considered in conjunction with developable lands on the opposite side of North Strand Road (located in the Docklands SDRA), their redevelopment has potential to deliver a new 'gateway' civic hub at the crossing of the Tolka River moving towards the city centre. This site is located within a protected Tidal Flood Zone A from the Tolka River. A Site Specific Flood Risk Assessment should be carried out for a redevelopment of this site.

Redevelopment of this North Strand/Poplar Row site should provide a built edge along all three street frontages, while enhanced height could be provided for along the Poplar Row frontage, at a position set back from the corner. Development immediately at this corner should respond to the prevailing built form character along this section of North Strand.

17. Abbey/Peacock Theatres

The Abbey Theatre has played a pivotal role in Irish theatre though history at this central location. It is now in need of redevelopment/expansion in order to meet modern standards and to ensure adequate space for associated activities including offices and rehearsal spaces. To meet this aim, the council support the redevelopment of the existing Abbey Theatre and Peacock Theatre buildings and adjoining sites to create a vibrant new cultural quarter with high quality architecture and public realm that maximises linkages and frontage to the River Liffey.

Figure 13-10:   SDRA Northeast Inner City

Figure 13.10

 

13.13 SDRA 11 – St. Teresa’s Gardens and Environs

Introduction

St. Teresa’s Gardens is a local authority housing estate that was built in the early 1950s, which has been the subject of plans for demolition and regeneration over a number of years. The scheme as originally constructed contained 346 residential units, accommodated in twelve 4-storey flat blocks, ten 2-storey houses and 10 commercial units. St. Teresa’s Gardens, including the housing complex and the local authority owned playing fields to the south-west, totals approximately 6.0 hectares.

Adjoining the estate, is the former Player Wills and Bailey Gibson sites, including the St. Teresa’s church site on Donore Avenue (c4.6 hectares), which has been subject of recent large scale planning applications for residential development. Also adjoining the site is the Coombe Hospital site (2.32 hectares), which is proposed to be re-located to the St. James’s Hospital Campus, creating a longer term opportunity site. The overall site, therefore, equates to c13Ha.

Together, these key sites present considerable opportunities for re-development within the city in order to:

  • Deliver a mixed-use quarter with a considerable capacity for high quality residential accommodation and complementary uses.
  • To maximise the potential of well-connected but underutilised brownfield low-intensity residential land, situated within the existing built fabric of the city and adjacent to the proposed Greenhills to City Centre Core Bus Corridor.
  • To support the development of a network of streets and public spaces to ensure the physical, social and economic integration of St. Teresa’s Gardens with the former Player Wills and Bailey Gibson sites and adjoining lands.

The guiding principles applicable to SDRA 11 are as follows:

Urban Structure

The proposed urban structure provides a strategic blueprint for the future development of the SDRA, identifying key connections, public open spaces, locations for increased height and building frontages that will inform an urban design-led approach to the regeneration of this strategic area. The development of a network of streets and public spaces will be promoted to ensure the physical, social and economic integration of St. Teresa’s Gardens with the former Player Wills and Bailey Gibson sites. The potential for further integration with the Coombe Hospital is indicated on the Guiding Principles Map but is indicative only. Regard will need to be had to any flooding constraints in the redevelopment of the Coombe Hospital lands in terms of land use and block layout. Integration of the White Heather Industrial Estate lands should be investigated in the future.

The movement framework and street structure, as illustrated in the Guiding Principles Map, introduces permeability through the site, based on proposed key east-west and north-south links and several proposed local access streets. Ensuring north/south (Cork St. and Donore Avenue connection to South Circular Road) permeability and east/west (Dolphin’s Barn Street and Cork Street) is achieved.

Generous well designed, attractive multifunctional public open spaces with good orientation, connectivity, passive and active supervision/overlooking etc. will be provided and will deliver high quality residential and public amenity.

A new public park is proposed as a landmark feature with passive supervision by residential and other uses; it will have a comprehensive landscaping strategy to provide significant greenery within the site and will make provision for a diverse range of recreational and sporting facilities for use by the wider neighbourhood and will provide for an area sufficient in size to accommodate a minimum 80 m by 130 m playing pitch.

Land Use & Activity

The area will primarily support residential uses, complemented by a range of community facilities accessible to the wider community, such as the playing pitches on the northern end of the site and community facilities located in the former Player Wills building. This will include the provision of elements such as a GAA pitch on the DCC lands, local parks on the Baily Gibson and Player Wills sites, including a playground on the Player Wills site.

The area will promote a mix of tenure and residential unit types with social, affordable and private units being provided across the site and a mix of one bed, two bed and family sized units.

Provision shall be made for the expansion of St. Catherine’s National School, Donore Avenue, in the redevelopment of the former Player Wills site, subject to agreement with the Department of Education and Skills.

Height

  • In general, the height strategy for the SDRA is that building heights in the range of 6-8 storeys will be considered the baseline height for new developments, subject to adequately interacting with the existing building heights adjacent to the subject site.
  • The SDRA Guiding Principles Map identifies locations suitable for increased height over and above the standard 6-8 storeys, subject to compliance with Appendix 3 of the development plan.
  • The SDRA Guiding Principles Map identifies opportunities for landmark buildings in the order of 15-22 storeys to frame the proposed centrally located open space and to enhance the legibility of the built environment. The acceptability of such landmark buildings will be subject to compliance with the performance criteria for landmark buildings set out in Appendix 3 of the development plan.

Design

  • High-quality public realm will be required and shall be applied to the network of streets and public spaces. Public realm improvements/studies at the key junctions of Dolphin’s Barn/South Circular Road and Cork Street/Donore Avenue will be supported.
  • The existing established residential amenity of properties along South Circular Road, Donore Avenue, and Eugene Street shall be respected. As such, proposed developments will be required to demonstrate integration with the surrounding streetscapes.

Green Infrastructure

  • The provision of public open space and permeability through the site will contribute towards the creation of new green infrastructure in the area.
  • At least 20% of the SDRA site is to be retained for public open space, recreation and sporting facilities including an area to facilitate organised games.

Figure 13-11:   SDRA 11 St. Teresa’s Gardens and Environs

Figure 13.11

 

13.14 SDRA 12 – Dolphin House

Introduction

The SDRA lands comprise mainly the Dolphin Estate lands as well as immediately contiguous lands onto South Circular Road and Dolphins Barn Road and the Grand Canal/Dolphin Road. The Dolphin Estate (Dolphin House and Park) is a large local authority apartment complex on circa 7.5 hectares of land in the south-west inner city, addressing Dolphin’s Barn to the east and the Grand Canal to the south.

The layout, definition and condition of much of the existing buildings and public realm in the Dolphin Estate are poor and the area has a history of socio-economic deprivation.

It is an objective of the development plan that the Dolphin Housing estate will be regenerated to provide an attractive and sustainable residential community, alongside appropriate community, commercial and leisure facilities.

Phase 1 of this regeneration process was delivered on the eastern part of the site and consisted of the demolition of two blocks and the development of a total of 100 new dwelling units (including new houses, new apartments and amalgamated/refurbished units within three existing blocks), with buildings ranging between 1 to 4 storeys in height.

The SDRA promotes the demolition of the remaining blocks and the development of a Masterplan for the delivery of new housing and associated facilities on the Dublin City Council site in order to maximise the potential of this well-connected but underutilised brownfield low-intensity location, situated within the existing built fabric of the city and adjacent to the proposed Greenhills to City Centre Core Bus Corridor.

In relation to the wider SDRA area, there are opportunity sites to redevelop such as at the corner of Dolphins Barn Road and immediately to the north of the Dolphin House lands. There is also the opportunity to create better interaction with the Grand Canal and to improve the public realm at the key junctions in the area to facilitate active travel.

The guiding principles to achieve the successful regeneration of SDRA 12 are as follows:

Urban Structure

The proposed urban structure provides a strategic blueprint for the future development of the SDRA, identifying key connections, public open spaces, locations for increased height and building frontages that will inform an urban design-led approach to the regeneration of this strategic area. The development of a network of streets and public spaces will be promoted to ensure the physical, social and economic integration of the Dolphin estate with the wider Dolphin’s Barn area.

  • The movement framework and street structure, as illustrated in the SDRA Guiding Principles Map, introduces permeability through the site, based on proposed key east-west and north-south links and several proposed local access streets. Ensuring east-to-west connections from Dolphin’s Barn towards Herberton Road and north to south connections from the South Circular Road to the Grand Canal will be facilitated.
  • Generous well designed, attractive multifunctional public open spaces with good orientation, connectivity, passive and active supervision/overlooking will be provided and will deliver high quality residential and public amenity.
  • Maximise the opportunity for public realm improvements at the main crossroad junctions in the SDRA, in conjunction with potential improvements associated with the proposed Bus Connects project.
  • A new public park in the Dolphin Estate is proposed as a landmark feature with passive supervision by residential and other uses; it will have a comprehensive landscaping strategy to provide significant greenery within the scheme.
  • The feasibility of a new pedestrian crossing point over the Grand Canal to connect with Dolphin Road will be explored.

Land Use & Activity

  • The area will primarily support residential uses, complemented by community facilities accessible to the wider community and the development of a vibrant mixed-use element with high-quality streetscape on the eastern end of the Dolphin Estate. It will consolidate the southern end of Dolphin’s Barn and will promote the reinvigoration of Dolphin’s Barn village centre.
  • The development of synergies with other regeneration areas in close proximity will be promoted for co-ordination in the provision of new facilities; new parks, recreation and community facilities will be promoted as features accessible to the wider neighbourhood for inclusion and integration of the site with the adjoining area.
  • The area will promote a mix of tenure and residential unit types, supporting the provision of social, cost rental and private tenure homes.
  • Taking a target density of 130-140 units per hectare and the existing development that has taken place on site, this land bank has the potential to deliver an indicative c. 660-760 residential units.

Height

  • In general, the height strategy for the SDRA is that building heights in the range of 4-8 storeys will be promoted, subject to adequately interacting with the existing building heights adjacent to the subject site. This may require the provision of lower heights on the boundaries of the site to the northwest.
  • The SDRA Guiding Principles Map identifies locations suitable for increased height over and above the standard 4-8 storeys, subject to the considerations relating to locally higher buildings contained in Appendix 3 of the development plan. This includes the potential provision of a taller building on the corner of Dolphin’s Barn Street and South Circular Road.

Green Infrastructure

  • Significant areas of the SDRA shall be retained for public open space, recreation and sporting facilities.
  • The Grand Canal Corridor shall be supported as a green infrastructure corridor, with improvements in access and usability of the canal emphasised in development proposals as well as the potential to improve the connections beyond the SDRA site.

Figure 13-12:   SDRA 12 Dolphin House

Figure 13.12

 

13.15 SDRA 13 – Markets Area and Environs

Introduction

The markets area, with the Victorian Fruit and Vegetable Markets building as the centrepiece, is rich in history, encompassing long established market and trading streets. The area, bounded by North King Street to the north, Capel Street to the east, Church Street to the west and lnns and Ormond Quays to the south, interlinks the historic Smithfield area with the core retail area to the east.

The area’s rich history and medieval origins is reflected in both the variety of current uses (which include residential, civic, commercial, religious and retail) and also in its historic street pattern and built fabric. The significance of the area is also recognised in planning designations, with an established Architectural Conservation Area (ACA) along Capel Street and a range of identified protected structures within the area, including the Victorian Markets building, Saint Marys Abbey, and the Four Courts complex, and the area’s inclusion in an area of archaeological interest. The area also has a number of low intensity and under-utilised sites, which offer potential for quality urban regeneration.

Recognising the area’s assets, this SDRA provides a framework to ensure a coherent and structured approach to the future development of the area by providing guidance for specific sites that can act as catalysts to drive sustainable regeneration. It is envisaged that this structured guidance for the SDRA will help realise the potential of the area, improving its integration with both the core retail area around Henry Street /Mary Street further east and with the Smithfield area to the west.

The guiding principles for SDRA 13 are as follows:

Urban Structure

  • To realise the potential of the Fruit and Vegetable Market building as an iconic architectural, cultural and community centrepiece for a revitalised Markets area.
  • To facilitate the wholescale regeneration of the public realm and pedestrian environment as identified in the Guiding Principles Map, and encourage development that contributes to the activation and upgrade of these spaces.
  • To encourage the regeneration of the Markets area as a key component of the western expansion of the North Inner City core connecting the Henry/Mary St. area with Smithfield and to facilitate improved legibility and ease of pedestrian movement between the three areas.

Land Use and Activity

Context and Land Uses

The majority of the lands are zoned ‘Z5’ reflecting the area’s central location suited to a variety of land-uses including both commercial and residential. Some areas are zoned for more specific purposes mostly to recognise the need to conserve architectural heritage in this very historic part of the city centre. These include lands around the Bridewell Garda Station, the Four Courts, Law Library and associated lands to which a Z8 zoning applies and buildings to the north of Saint Michan’s Park, including the Debtors Prison and courthouse building, which are all zoned Z8. Some older residential streets are zoned as residential conservation areas (Z2), including streets adjoining Church Street (which was built in response to the collapse of a tenement at Church Street and is one of the first Corporation housing schemes) and around Father Matthew Square/Ormond Square.

Capel Street and its historical commercial origins, is located within an Architectural Conservation Area, and the area from Beresford Street to Green Street, including a distillery building and also Saint Michan’s Church and along the Liffey Quays and buildings are outlined with the conservation area objective. (See Section 11.5.3)

Having regard to the above, a framework for redevelopment of underutilised sites needs to demonstrate sensitive integration whilst also generating new vitality. Opportunities for the creation of quality new green/open spaces as part of larger redevelopment projects can supplement existing spaces at Chancery Park, St. Michan’s Park and Ormond Square. There is also considerable scope for public realm upgrades which can both enhance the setting of these spaces and provide quality connections between key destinations.

Taking into account the designation of the SDRA as an area of archaeological interest, the significance of this area in medieval Dublin’s history and the rich archaeological material evident in this area; there is a presumption against basement development in all but exceptional circumstances.

Housing & Community
  • To promote an appropriate mix and diversity of residential accommodation.
  • To support community facilities serving the area, such as the Macro Community Resource Centre on Green Street, which provides an integrated facility for a range of community services and voluntary organisations.
  • To support the provision of an appropriately located public civic space to serve the community.
Open Space
  • To create an interlinked hierarchy of public open spaces and routes including civic spaces and parks, throughout the Markets area that are attractive, multi-functional, safe, welcoming and accessible to local residents, workers and visitors.
  • To support the implementation of the projects identified in the Markets Public Realm Masterplan and encourage the provision of new open space on site as part of larger redevelopment opportunities where feasible; increasing the overall open space provision in the area.

Height

There is substantial variation in building height in this area, reflective of the area’s rich history and evolving range of uses. Scope for enhanced height is considered somewhat constrained due to the prevailing height, scale and fine grain of existing development, in situ archaeology, along with sensitivities associated with the Capel Street ACA, the extent of protected structures and designated conservation areas.

Landmark buildings are generally not considered appropriate in this SDRA. However, it is acknowledged that some of the larger regeneration sites, such as the “Total Produce” site have the potential to accommodate some increased height and locally higher buildings. The site at Ryders Row also has potential for locally higher buildings due to the setting at the junction of two busy streets.

Design and Green Infrastructure

  • To support the implementation of the projects identified in the City Markets Public Realm Greening Strategy, to enhance biodiversity and amenity.
  • To support the redesign of Saint Michan’s Park and associated public realm and amenity improvements.
  • To exploit opportunities for street trees and low level planting.
  • To encourage the installation of features referencing the route of the culverted Bradogue River in the public realm. This may be through creative use of materials, installation of signage/information boards, or through public art features.

Movement and Transport

  • To reinforce the existing pedestrian spine identified in the Guiding Principles Map and to capitalise on it through targeted permeability interventions increasing connectivity and encouraging pedestrian and cycle journeys throughout the area.
  • To facilitate increased pedestrian space on Capel St and throughout the area.
  • To support an improved pedestrian route on Cuckoo Lane in providing a quality link route through the area; that respects the heritage materials of the Lane.
  • To facilitate delivery of cycle routes identified in the Guiding Principles Map and the NTA GDA Cycle Strategy.
  • To explore the provision of new cycling and pedestrian connections through the areas crossing the River Liffey and connecting to Fishamble Street.

Guiding Principles for Key Opportunity Sites

1 - ‘Total Produce’ Site

Development on this large site will require a sensitive approach that incorporates variation on each elevation to avoid monolithic built forms. Some boundaries for this site will need to set back to allow for the widening George's Hill and at Beresford and Mary’s Lane, and to facilitate adequate separation distances from the buildings opposite, whilst also preserving their character. The 10% allocation of public open space should be located at the south-east corner of the site where it can benefit from generous solar gain and the activation provided by the revitalised markets building.

Base height should be 6-7 storeys, where residential amenity considerations allow, while additional heights at the identified locations could reach 8-9 storeys at the south-east of the site and up to 12 storeys at the north-east of the site. Any height over the base level shall be confined to the illustrated locations, should be clearly defined architecturally, and should not extend substantially along the block.

2 - Fish Market Site

The regeneration of the Fish Market site allows for the development of a building of civic use as well as the provision of ancillary services to the market opposite. The redevelopment of the site should accommodate a new public space/continued amenity uses at the northern end of the site.

In time, such public open space has the potential to be visually continuous with that proposed for of the Total Produce site, and across Mary's Lane. This visual integration should be carefully considered at early design stage in regard to layout and materials.

Any redevelopment of this site could accommodate its current and emerging uses at basement or roof level, subject to related assessments.

3 - TU Dublin Site

This substantial site is positioned between a DCC housing project to the north and established residential development to the south. The building and lands are associated with the Technical University (TU) which is currently consolidating many of its educational facilities at its Grangegorman campus nearby. If redeveloped, the predominant land use should be residential. It could also accommodate alternative (and compatible) ground floor uses. The east-west orientation of the site could accommodate an L-shaped or U-shaped building block with a southerly aspect.

4 – Site adjacent to the Courthouse/Debtor’s Prison

This infill site, largely comprising a surface car park, lies between the Green Street courthouse and the Debtor’s Prison, both of which are protected structures of considerable historic and architectural merit and dating from the late 1700s.

Sensitive development of the infill space has potential to interlink the two heritage buildings and provide new or associated uses which could include exhibition space and or community/event space, hence facilitating public access and wider appreciation of these heritage buildings. There is also potential for a new green strip connecting to St. Michan’s Park to the south.

5 - Ryders Row

A site of considerable visual prominence, its redevelopment should contribute a building of significant architectural merit, befitting its location at a key nodal point and vista termination along Parnell Street.

With respect to built form and height, it should respond to the prevailing built form, character and grain of the established buildings to its west along Parnell St. However, at the corner it could accommodate a slender building of up to 8-10 storeys. Whilst outside the immediate SDRA boundary, the development of this site has potential to signal the route from Parnell Street through to the markets area.

 

Figure 13-13:   SDRA 13 Markets Area and Environs

Figure 13.13

 

13.16 SDRA 14 – St. James Medical Campus and Environs

Introduction

The St. James’s Hospital Campus, located in Dublin’s south inner city, occupies a site extending to 19.3 hectares. The extensive site, which has been a focus for healthcare since 1730, comprises various building forms dating from the nineteenth to the twenty first century, interspersed with temporary structures and surface car parking areas. The western section of the campus is undergoing intensive regeneration with the construction of the new National Children’s Hospital.

The hospital provides a major health and knowledge base within the city, partnered with Trinity College Dublin. Plans to consolidate and enhance these uses are supported by the Dublin Area Metropolitan Strategic Plan which identifies the hospital as a key employment zone and enabler in the delivery of the Regional Spatial and Economic Strategy. The Hospital has identified the following programme of works over the course of the development plan: (i) Trinity St. James’s Cancer Institute, (ii) Ambulatory Care Centre, (iii) relocation of the Coombe Women’s and Infants Hospital, (iv) critical care centre, and (v) acute mental health inpatient and community facility.

The City Council supports the further regeneration and intensification of health, research and educational uses within this site, subject to the key guiding principles set out below and the requirement for a Masterplan to be agreed with the Planning Authority. Opportunities to create a healthcare hub surrounding the hospital campus will also be encouraged and supported where feasible.

The vision to develop St. James’s Hospital campus as a leading health and innovation hub is underpinned by the following guiding principles:

Urban Structure

The future intensification and development proposals for the hospital shall be set out in the context of a Masterplan to be agreed with the Planning Authority that shall address the following key points:

  • The Masterplan shall set out a strategic blueprint for the future development of the SDRA, identifying key connections, public open space and building frontages that will inform an urban-design-led approach to the development of this strategic site.
  • A mobility management strategy shall inform the preparation of the Masterplan. This shall address the need to provide enhanced connectivity both within the site and with the surrounding area creating a more accessible and permeable hospital campus. In particular, there is a need for enhanced pedestrian and cycle links and public transport links that reduce the need for private vehicles and minimise traffic impacts on the wider community.
  • Opportunities to provide enhanced pedestrian / cycle connectivity between the hospital campus and Heuston Station will be sought with the potential for a riverside walk along the Camac to be explored.
  • The provision of a pedestrian focused campus shall be complemented by pubic open spaces that provide “break-out” accessible spaces with links to the surrounding green infrastructure.

Land Use & Activity

Hospital Campus
  • The objective is to consolidate and support the vision for St. James’s as a lead academic health sciences campus.
Hospital Environs
  • Local synergies that support the creation of an innovation corridor of enterprise, investment and employment in the wider St. James’s environs will be encouraged. The attraction of health- and knowledge-related industries including bio and life sciences, healthcare, creative and digital industries and medical supplies provide complementary uses to the hospital campus with potential to consolidate this area as a national and international driver within these key knowledge sectors.
  • Proposals to promote investment in the local area, to provide new affordable homes and amenities for staff and a training centre for healthcare workers will be encouraged.
  • The work of the St. James’s Hospital Community Benefits Oversight Group shall continue to ensure that as the campus is regenerated, so too are the benefits shared in the surrounding communities.

Height

  • In general building heights of 6-8 storeys will be encouraged, with opportunities for locally higher buildings at the St. James’s Gateway and Luas.

Design

  • High-quality public realm will be required and shall be applied to the network of streets and public spaces.
  • Innovation in design will be encouraged to complement the vision for a world class health and education centre.
  • Developments must respond to the design and setting of protected structures, respecting the historic nature of this campus.
  • The provision of shared public spaces, both indoor and outdoor, shall be encouraged to provide opportunities for networking and socialising.
  • St. James’s Street gateway: Carry out public realm improvements and redevelop the use of vacant sites on James’s Street at the northern end of the entrance to the hospital.
  • James’s Walk/ Grand Canal Park: public realm improvements will be sought/ delivered to enhance this linear space which acts as a southern gateway to the hospital campus and an amenity for the local community. Opportunities to link the hospital campus / public open spaces to this linear park with be sought.

Green Infrastructure

  • The Masterplan shall include a green infrastructure strategy that provides amenity and biodiversity space in addition to surface water attenuation measures.
  • Support provision of a green corridor along the Camac River with new landscaping and enhanced pedestrian/cycle connectivity at Old Kilmainham, including if feasible, connections to Kilmainham Mills and IMMA.

Figure 13-14:   SDRA 14 St. James Medical Campus and Environs

Figure 13.14

 

13.17 SDRA 15 – Liberties and Newmarket Square

Introduction

This SDRA corresponds to the area defined by the Liberties Local Area Plan 2009. With the expiration of the Local Area Plan (LAP) in May 2020, the SDRA seeks to incorporate relevant elements of the LAP, as appropriate, that have yet to be realised.

While considerable urban consolidation and regeneration of the Liberties area has occurred in recent decades, significant opportunities for regeneration and enhancement still exist, as identified in the guiding principles for this SDRA. It is an objective of the plan to recognise the unique role the Liberties plays in Dublin’s character and to ensure that regeneration safeguards the Liberties’ strong sense of community identity and cultural vibrancy into the future.

The guiding principles for SDRA 15 are as follows:

Urban Structure

  • To recognise the importance of the historical spine of the Liberties and its medieval street network.
  • To identify permeability interventions to augment this network and also to restore historic laneways, where appropriate.
  • To recognise and enhance the role that civic and historic buildings play in the identity and legibility of the Liberties area.
  • To create a hierarchy of public open spaces including civic squares and parks, throughout the Liberties that are attractive, multi-functional, safe, welcoming and accessible to local residents, workers and visitors.
  • To support the regeneration of large blocks in order to provide the opportunity to improve the human scale of the existing urban structure.
  • To reinforce a sense of place and identity by promoting the development of distinctive character areas as indicated on the Guiding Principles Map.

Land Use & Activity

  • To recognise the varied and historic land-use mix that contributes to the character of the Liberties area.
  • To recognise the strong community that exists in the Liberties area and the contribution it makes to the fabric of the area.
  • To support the regeneration and reopening of the Iveagh Markets and recognise the historic and cultural importance of its existence.
  • To support the delivery of the Liberties Creative Cluster and other initiatives to strengthen the arts within the Liberties.
  • To recognise the contribution that 3rd level education institutions make to the Liberties area.
  • To recognise the need for community uses and public spaces to complement the emerging development in recent decades.
  • To support the use of Newmarket Square for market trading and other beneficial public uses including as appropriate, works to enhance universal access, the pedestrian environment and public realm
  • To deliver a civic hub as part of the regeneration of the Pimlico flat complex.
  • To support the provisions of the Smart D8 project in relation to the provision of a Healthcare Innovation Corridor.
  • To undertake an audit of community infrastructure in the Liberties area in order to identify community needs.

Height

  • To support 6-8 storeys as a benchmark height for new developments in the SDRA area where conservation and design considerations permit. Opportunities for locally higher buildings above the benchmark height, that will be slender in nature, are identified in the accompanying Guiding Principles Map.
  • Opportunities exist for buildings of increased height in line with the considerations outlined in Appendix 3 of the development plan. The potential locations for locally higher buildings are shown on the accompanying Guiding Principles Map, with an indication of potential heights set down for the different character areas below, as relevant.

Design

  • To identify and protect the distinctive heritage of the area and encourage sustainable and innovative re-use of historic spaces and structures.
  • To ensure that the individual character of different areas within the Liberties is protected and enhanced by contemporary and high-quality design of new buildings.
  • To ensure that new buildings respond to the scale and grain of the prevailing character of the particular street.
  • To undertake a public realm study for the Vicar St. area to enhance the amenity and character of the Molyneux Lane, Swift's Alley and Vicar St. area. This will also create a more cohesive relationship between the Meath St. and Francis St. areas.
  • To provide for the possibility of urban realm and transport interchange improvements to be made in the north-western corner of the Guinness lands (north of Thomas St.) having regard to its important location as a gateway into the city, its proximity to heavy rail and Luas stops and its placemaking potential on Victoria Quay.
  • To carry out public realm works at Newmarket, Francis St., Meath St. and Cork St., as identified on the Guiding Principles Map.
  • All new apartment buildings are encouraged to have own-door access for all dwellings at ground floor level to contribute to increased vitality and activation of the area.
  • Improve the quality of the Liberties’ main thoroughfares - Cork St., Thomas/James’s St., Francis St., Meath St. and Marrowbone Lane, through improvements to the public realm and greening strategies and by establishing frontage of appropriate character and scale in relation to the street width.

Green Infrastructure

  • To support the implementation of the projects identified in the Liberties Greening Strategy and to identify further projects within the SDRA that offer opportunities for biodiversity enhancement, SuDS interventions and increasing the tree canopy coverage of the area.
  • To ensure that the public open space provision of development sites be sited at locations that are visible, accessible and inviting to the wider public.
  • To facilitate the creation of high quality cycle and walking routes that connect to existing and emerging public open space provision. These routes should be the subject of greening, where possible.
  • To support the creation of a public park as part of the regeneration of the Pimlico flat complex involving the consolidation of the Poole St. playing facilities and the existing pocket park at the corner of Earl St. and Thomas Court Bawn.
  • To support the provision of a new public park on Diageo lands north of Thomas St. as part of any redevelopment.
  • To examine the possibility for the open spaces at Brú Chaoimhín and the Weir Home (in the ownership of the HSE) to become available for public patronage.
  • To promote the redesign of St. James' Linear Park.
  • To support the refurbishment of the former handball court at the western end of Robert Emmet Walk.
  • To examine the potential to expand the community garden at Flanagan’s Field on Rueben St.

Movement and Transport

  • To facilitate the delivery of the permeability interventions identified in the Guiding Principles Map which seek to increase accessibility throughout the area and in particular, to the identified network of walking and cycling infrastructure that is emerging throughout the SDRA.
  • To encourage development that enhances the vitality of this emerging network of walking and cycling infrastructure.
  • To facilitate delivery of cycle routes identified in the NTA GDA Cycle Strategy.
  • To support the pedestrian connection linking Oisín Kelly Park at Basin View with St James' Linear Park.
  • To maximise the potential benefit of the BusConnects project to the Liberties area in terms of public realm improvements, green infrastructure and pedestrian and cycling infrastructure.

Guiding Principles for Key Opportunity Sites

1- Iveagh Market

The contribution that the reopening of the Iveagh Market as a public market can make for the Liberties area as well as the wider city is acknowledged and the SDRA supports its regeneration for this purpose. The Mother Redcaps buildings also offer a significant opportunity to be regenerated to provide for an ancillary or complementary use to the future reopening of the Iveagh Markets. It is considered that the improvement of east west linkages in this character area will support the redevelopment of these significant sites.

2 - Vicar Street

Redevelopment within this area should seek to provide built edges to the lanes and streets contained within and to facilitate the creation/improvement of the north-south routes identified in the Guiding Principles Map, for example through active frontages or own-door access to ground floor units.

In this area, base heights should be 6-8 storeys, where heritage, built form, character and residential amenity considerations allow, while there is potential for locally higher buildings at the identified locations.

A public realm study should be conducted for the public space identified in the Guiding Principles Map, with the aim of building upon the planned public realm improvements for Francis St. and Meath St.

3 - Newmarket

The Newmarket area is currently undergoing significant change. As part of this change, redevelopment of the larger blocks should contribute to the creation of a permeable, active network of pedestrian streets, as identified in the Guiding Principles Map. In particular, development should deliver active and animated frontages along the building edges, in particular, at the Cork St. and Newmarket Square interfaces. In this regard, development should respond to the emerging public realm improvements at Newmarket Square and surrounds.

In this area, base heights should be 6-8 storeys, where heritage, built form character and residential amenity considerations allow. However, along the Cork St. frontage, heights should respond to the prevailing heights on this part of the street. The opportunity for locally higher buildings up to 12-14 storeys to provide urban design and placemaking benefits to the emerging character of the Newmarket area exists at the identified locations.

Better integration of Newmarket with the Coombe and areas further to the north as part of any public realm works to Cork St. or as part of the BusConnects project will be pursued.

Community and cultural uses at Newmarket Square should be protected into the future.

4 - Pimlico

This character area is located at the nexus of a number of different landholdings that have the capacity for significant regeneration. Accordingly, redevelopment of the lands should accommodate a civic/community hub and an enlarged area of public open space. A locally higher building of 10-12 storeys at this location would provide urban design and placemaking benefits to the emerging character of a revitalised Marrowbone Lane. Base heights should be 6-8 storeys, where heritage, built form character and residential amenity considerations allow.

The opportunity for a new north-south pedestrian connection to run through the lands, connecting up to Thomas St. to the north should be realised as part of any redevelopment.

5 - Digital Hub

The Digital Hub lands represent a significant regeneration opportunity. As part of their future redevelopment, the provision of two north-south pedestrian connections, identified in the Guiding Principles Map, should be delivered. These should remain accessible to the wider public at all hours of the day.

The lands contain a number of Protected Structures and also buildings that contribute greatly to the character of Thomas St. Their presence should inform the future character of the redeveloped lands. In this area, base heights should be 6-8 storeys, where heritage, built form character and residential amenity considerations allow, while additional heights at the identified locations could reach 10-12 storeys.

Given the scale of this landholding, it is appropriate that a masterplan be prepared for the entire area, to address the above matters in addition to planned phasing. Any masterplan should also provide for the delivery of enterprise and employment uses in this area.

A public space around St Patrick’s Tower should be delivered in any redevelopment of the site. A community/cultural facility should be incorporated into any redevelopment of the lands. A community and civic hub will be delivered as part of any redevelopment of the school site and lands on School Street.

6 - Marrowbone Lane

It is considered that the SDRA should deliver the objectives for the site including:

  • The council owned depot at Marrowbone Lane to be developed as a Green Infrastructure and Recreational Area.
  • Extension of amenity/recreational spaces in association with St. Catherine’s sports centre.
  • New east-west link through the site to the south of St. Catherine’s Sports Centre to link up with Allingham Street.
  • New north south pedestrian and cycling route (with access for parking and deliveries only) linking Marrowbone Lane with Cork Street via Allingham Street and Marion Villas.
  • Potential to provide additional connectivity from John Street South to Cork Street.
  • Provision for new mixed uses onto and Summer Street South to provide definition and activity onto the street.
  • Opportunities also exist for the provision of improved public open space onto Cork Street at Brú Chaoimhín and the Weir Home, subject to agreement with the HSE.
7 - St. James' Harbour

This area has considerable regeneration potential with both private and public land holdings of considerable scale. Connectivity and green infrastructure initiatives, as identified, are required in order to improve the amenity for existing and future residents and to better integrate the area with its adjoining institutions and neighbourhoods.

The potential for the reconfiguration/rationalisation of the education facilities in the area should be investigated, with opportunities for synergies identified.

In this area, base heights should be 6-8 storeys, where heritage, built form character and residential amenity considerations allow, while additional heights at the identified locations have potential to reach 12-14 storeys.

8 -Maryland

This area is generally characterised by low level residential development. Two areas of redevelopment potential are identified in the Guiding Principles Map that have the potential to increase connectivity within this character area.

In this area, where residential amenity considerations allow, base heights that should be pursued for new developments should be 6 storeys.

It is also considered that Flanagan’s Fields on Reuben Street should be retained as a community resource and that the possibility of extending the space to the south and east should be explored.

9 - Guinness Lands

While the operational requirements of the Guinness Lands to the north of Thomas St. are likely to remain beyond the term of the development plan, opportunities for smaller parcels of land to be redeveloped may arise in the medium term.

Given the key importance of Heuston Station from a transport point of view and as an entrance gateway to the city, a public realm study should be prepared for the lands to the front of Heuston Station as well as investigating the feasibility of continuing St. John's Road West through the site, freeing up part of Victoria Quay for integration into any new public open space in front of Heuston Station. The potential of a new bridge linking Victoria Quay with the National Museum Collins Barracks/Croppies Acre should be explored.

Improvements to the pedestrian and amenity quality of the connection between Heuston Station and St. James' Hospital should be pursued. Future redevelopment of the lands fronting Steeven's Lane should be designed to contribute to this need for improvement.

The lands to the south of Thomas St. contain less operational requirements and represent a more immediate redevelopment opportunity to create a new urban district. These lands contain a large concentration of buildings of heritage importance. The presence of these buildings should inform the future built form and character of any redevelopment of the lands. The potential for increased connectivity through the site should be explored and linkages with the character areas of St. James Harbour and Digital Hub explored.

In this area, where heritage considerations allow, base heights should be 6-8 storeys while locally higher buildings at the identified locations in the Guiding Principles Map could reach 12-14 storeys.

Given the scale of these two sites, it is appropriate that in advance of any development proposal, a masterplan be prepared and agreed for the respective site, taking into consideration the wider area, to address the above matters in addition to planned phasing.

A community/cultural facility of significance should be incorporated into any redevelopment of the lands.


Figure 13-15:   SDRA 15 Liberties and Newmarket Square

SDRA Map 15

 

13.18 SDRA 16 – Oscar Traynor Road

Introduction

The Oscar Traynor Road SDRA (c. 17.2 ha) is located to the south-east of the junction of Oscar Traynor Road and the M1 interchange. The lands have a relatively flat topography, are currently vacant and covered in scrub vegetation. They are bound by the M1 / M 50 motorway / Port Tunnel entrance to the west, R104 Coolock Lane (Oscar Traynor Road) to the north, astro-turf football pitches and Gaelscoil Cholmcille to the north-east, Castletimon Gardens to the east, and the rear of two storey houses which front onto Lorcan Cresent to the south.

The overarching vision for this SDRA is to maximise the potential of a well-connected but underutilised low-intensity residential lands, situated within the existing built fabric of the city and the creation of a new high quality residential quarter with a neighbourhood centre and landscaped open spaces and parks, which integrates with its surrounding, mainly residential, environs. The site has an estimated capacity of 850 – 1,000 residential units in addition to community, recreational and retail facilities.

The following guiding principles will apply to the SDRA:

Land-use and Activity

  • To create a planned residential quarter integrated with the surrounding established area and with enhanced permeability. A mixture of unit types and tenures including family housing will be promoted. The provision of senior citizens homes is also supported.
  • To provide a new neighbourhood centre promoting a distinctive place-making component at the entrance to the site. It is envisaged that this will form a local hub within the site and accommodate local retail, services, crèche and community uses. The neighbourhood centre should integrate with a central park which incorporates the Naniken Stream as an integral feature.
  • All development proposals are to adhere to development guidance on flight path, airport noise zone and public safety zones. See Chapter 15 Development Standards for further details.

Height

  • To seek higher building forms at the northern and western edges of the site with heights in the range of 6-10 storeys being generally appropriate (subject to appropriate design considerations), scaling down to the east and south where the site adjoins existing 2-storey residential housing.
  • The heights of buildings along the central park should be designed to respect the orientation of the park and should form a coherent civic frontage to the park. Careful design should be given to development adjacent to the motorway to minimise noise impact. A strong spine of higher apartment buildings presenting their ends to the motorway to optimise site orientation and create sheltered courtyard spaces may be appropriate.

Design

  • To seek a high quality architectural design response to both individual buildings and streetscape settings/elevations for the entire site but having particular regard to the approaches from the M1 southwards and along Coolock Lane/Oscar Traynor Road. Elevational treatment and materiality that provides both variety and coherence will be promoted.
  • To seek creative architectural solutions to single buildings such as the neighbourhood centre to ensure these buildings differentiate themselves from the mainly residential nature of the remaining site. High quality materials will be sought to boundary treatments and the public realm.

Green Infrastructure

  • To provide a variety of high quality green spaces for a range of different users throughout the site including the main central park, pocket parks, private courtyards, nature trails along the perimeters etc. There is to be a minimum 20% of the site in public open space.
  • To ensure that the Naniken Stream forms an integrated feature of the central park and that habitat ponds and a naturalised river section are included where feasible.
  • To design the central park to include recreation spaces including play spaces for all ages, a skate park, outdoor exercise equipment etc. A network of paths that connect through and around it with direct and circular routes should be provided. Allotments and orchards should be included where feasible.
  • To provide a new urban park connecting the Gaelscoil grounds with an urban play area located close to the school and accessed from the school grounds. This park should also contain:
    • A bespoke play area.
    • Outdoor games such as table tennis tables.
    • A MUGA (Multi-Use Play Area).
    • A pedestrian pathway to the school to facilitate the use of the park by the school.

Movement and Transport

  • To provide high levels of permeability throughout the site integrating with existing residential streets to the east and south where feasible with pedestrian links to the north-west to connect with the western side of the M1 Port tunnel access route. Development should include permeable green routes through the site to make new connections to the wider community, adjoining school and to Coolock Lane.
  • To provide for increased pedestrian safety and permeability including:
    • A connected series of routes with a readable hierarchy leading to and through the central parkland.
    • A new signalised junction on Coolock Lane to access the proposed development, the school and Astroturf centre. This proposed main access junction from Coolock Lane will incorporate a high quality pedestrian/cyclist facilities for those accessing the site.
    • Pedestrian priority features with visual and speed reducing measures.
    • >Liveable, green, safe streets with a strong sense of place.
    • Increased links to residential areas to the south via new pedestrian/cyclist linkages.
    • Address existing east-west permeability and connectivity issues through potential future enhanced crossing facilities at the Coolock Interchange.
    • Reduce walking distances between Beaumont Hospital and Coolock Interchange by improved permeability.
    • Hierarchical approach to the use of materials, which will be used to reflect road hierarchy including changes to carriageway surface material to emphasise transitional zones and changes in material on raised table junctions to encourage low vehicle speeds.
  • To upgrade the existing two-stage pedestrian crossing on Coolock Lane to a single stage Toucan crossing. A Toucan crossing will also be provided across the southern arm of the junction which will connect to a segregated pedestrian/cyclist route on the western side of the OTR access and a shared facility on the eastern side.

 

Figure 13-16:   SDRA 16 Oscar Traynor Road

Figure 13.16

 

13.19 SDRA 17 – Werburgh Street

Introduction

Werburgh Street SDRA is within the medieval city walls and defined by Castle Street to the north, Hoey’s Court (Castle Steps) to the east, Ship Street Little to the south and Werburgh Street to the west. The Dublin City Walls and Defences Conservation Plan 2005 identified the city walls as one of the most important civic monuments in the capital city.

A framework was prepared for Dublin City Council in 2005 to provide a coherent strategy for this historic core of Dublin City. This plan proposed urban solutions for key spaces that will act as nodes for growth and linkage between one another and the wider city. Werburgh Street SDRA is informed by the Guiding Principles Map and recent planning history of the area. The SDRA will seek to achieve a core quarter that will exhibit a strong physical character, recover lost history and building fabric and provide activities that have beneficial effect on the future of this part of the city.

The area contains a number of Recorded Monuments that survive above and below ground. The upstanding remains of the medieval city walls are a National Monument. St. Werburgh’s Church and graveyard is both a Recorded Monument and a Protected Structure and the three storey house at number 4 Castle Street is also a Protected Structure. Werburgh Street is the site of the Pole Tower (a medieval mural tower) assumed to be under the road near the entrance to Jury’s car park. The area is also unique in containing well-preserved deep layers of buried waterlogged archaeological deposits from the Hiberno-Norse town. These deposits are of International importance as they relate to the origins of European urbanisation and to an extensive Viking trade network. The protection, curation and interpretation of this sensitive non-renewable resource for future research is a key priority for the SDRA.

The guiding principles for the area are as follows:

Urban Structure

  • To support the identity, historical and cultural significance of the city walls circuit and of the historic core of the city. To support the relevant objectives of the Dublin City Walls and Defences City Walls Conservation Plan.
  • Proposals must acknowledge the status and integrity of the walled circuit as a single, composite entity and place the identity, significance and function of the city walls and defences at the heart of future regeneration of this area.
  • To improve access and enhance the presentation and setting of the standing portions of the city walls at Ship Street Little.
  • Any re-development to ensure the long term preservation of the archaeology, embrace and enhance the historical and cultural significance of the area to the city.
  • Buildings within the prevailing height category (Appendix 3) will be considered, having regard to the conservation and archaeological sensitivity of the location.

Land Use & Connectivity

  • The sensitive redevelopment of underutilised sites to provide additional mixed use offering complementing the cultural, tourism and recreational activities of the area should be pursued.
  • To support the ecclesiastical and cultural use of St. Werburgh’s Church and improve access into St. Werburgh’s Church and graveyard.
  • To provide a pedestrian-friendly space and to improve the entrance and connection into Dublin Castle from Werburgh Street along Ship Street, and from Castle Street via the Castle Steps.
  • To recreate the line of Hoey’s Court (the birthplace of Johnathan Swift).
  • To provide a new wall walk at Hoeys’ Court, looking over Ship Street.
  • To open access to the wall walk from the existing gate on the Castle Steps (lower end).

Open Space and Amenity

  • Having regard to the cultural tourism destinations within the wider area, the regeneration of the SDRA lands should improve the visual and open space amenity of the area for the local community and visitors and improve pedestrian connectivity between destinations.
  • The River Poddle, runs below Ship Street in a Victorian culvert. The historic line of the Poddle is reflected by the upstanding City Walls on the north side of Ship Street. Proposals for Ship Street should provide an open plaza and prioritise pedestrian movement whilst celebrating the city walls and the grandeur of the historic precinct of Dublin Castle.
  • To seek the development of a new ‘square’ or space to the south of St. Werburgh’s Church.
  • To develop the lands adjoining the City Walls west of Werburgh Street as a landscaped area that supports local biodiversity whilst protecting the sensitive archaeological remains at this location; as a "meanwhile" use as until a full archaeological examination of this area takes place.

Design

There are two specific sites within the area that present an opportunity for re-development - see Guiding Principles Map. These sites are owned by the Office of Public Works (OPW) and are currently underutilised. Site 1 is a land bank currently in use as surface car parking on Castle Street. Site 2 is currently occupied by the Employment Exchange building located at the corner of Ship Street Little and the Castle Steps.

Proposals should ensure that the design for the sites should be of the highest architectural quality. Proposed structures should be light weight buildings with low impact foundations (i.e. under 5%) to allow for adequate in situ preservation of the archaeological deposits. The scale, massing and height of these buildings shall have due regard to the sensitive nature of the site, its monuments and historic setting.

Other infill developments in the area should be done in a sensitive manner. New developments should be of the highest quality design, materials and finish, with a density appropriate to the historic core and the medieval inter-mural status of the site.

It is the policy of Dublin City Council to continue to preserve, and enhance the surviving sections of the city walls and defences. Any proposal within close proximity (20m) of the city wall should have regard to the City Walls and Defences Conservation Plan. Any new use should be designed to have minimal impact on the subsurface archaeological deposits, and will be subject to Ministerial Consent, archaeological impact assessment and research-led excavation in accordance with the Medieval Dublin Archaeological Research Framework.

Green Infrastructure

New Developments shall include a green infrastructure strategy that provides amenity and biodiversity space in addition to surface water attenuation measures.

Figure 13-17:   SDRA 17 Werburgh Street

Figure 13.17